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2_SL0
6th June 2005, 16:31
Well I will happily admit there is a hole in my ability, or you could say Im coward.
I know the subject has been covered before but I just thought I would ask the question. Yesterday I was on the Coro loop ride, first half of the ride was fine, it was dry etc. The secondhalf, basically back down to Kopu it was wet. Im a big fat wuss and so I slowed right up, (partially due to not riding the new bike much in the wet wasnt sure what to expect) Im planning to get out in the wet a lot over the next few weeks and get some pratice, I DONT wanna become just a summer rider etc. Realistically its just coinfidence thing but as we came down into Kopu
(a) I was tired. (b) I had got out of sync, if that makes sense. (c) I had a dark visor on and thought I was in a full on thunderstorm. (Removing visor)
So how do you guys do it? Anything I should try?

John
6th June 2005, 16:36
Donít be "over careful" thatís the best method - visors are always interesting, I always dip my head at speed so that the rain carries the rain off the visor - never not think every move twice, try pay extra attention to puddles while maintaining a watchful eye on the cages.

Best way is experiencing, once you start skipping the rear out then you get a lot more confident in the rain - as a most part rain doesnít worry me at all - I have confidence in my bike, Only loose the rear on those real tight ones when I'm powering mid corner.

Riff Raff
6th June 2005, 16:39
Just practice, practice, practice. The more you get out in it the less scary it will become. I was fortunate because of all the riding I did between Auckland and Wellington. I had to ride through some pretty crappy weather and I soon got to know what my bike is capable of in the wet. Whilst it can pose a few more challenges, on the whole most of it was still fun.

NinjaBoy
6th June 2005, 16:53
I just remember every unsmooth gear change and braking movement becomes accentuated and the key has been to make every movement as smooth as possible. You'll also be quite surprised at how much you can push things before losing traction...

XTC
6th June 2005, 17:07
I just remember every unsmooth gear change and braking movement becomes accentuated and the key has been to make every movement as smooth as possible. You'll also be quite surprised at how much you can push things before losing traction...
What he said keep it smooth.
Then speed up a little at a time until you scare yourself shitless and then take it back a notch :)

Big Dave
6th June 2005, 17:29
Some time spent on a dirt bike and off road helps immeasurably too.
You won't get as freaked about sliding or starting to slide on the road once you've had an afternoon or two powering in the dirt.

2_SL0
6th June 2005, 17:43
I spent a fair bit of time on dirt bikes its not the sliding bit that worries me, its the sliding and landing on tarseal that worries me. On the dirt I would rarely see over 100kmh so it wasnt a worry. Sliding one of my dirt bikes at 40-100kmh was easy, sliding unexpectantly at 100kmh plus an tarseal is different kettle of fish, (well it is for me, downright scary). Plus sliding the dirt bike and landing on soft dirt or mud/sand wasnt a painful issue. I havent really pushed to see where the sliding point is, I really need to just get out in the rain more and get use to it. :weird:

justsomeguy
6th June 2005, 18:05
One of the things that scares me, is I enter corners too hot and get scared to lean more for fear of sliding and get scared of locking up the rear wheel as I change down too quickly - if I stay in the same gear and slow down - the bike basically runs out of power......so it's a scary no control coast through the corner..... waiting until I get my rear brakes then will practice more and more aggressive braking in the wet.......

WINJA
6th June 2005, 18:09
One of the things that scares me, is I enter corners too hot and get scared to lean more for fear of sliding and get scared of locking up the rear wheel as I change down too quickly - if I stay in the same gear and slow down - the bike basically runs out of power......so it's a scary no control coast through the corner..... waiting until I get my rear brakes then will practice more and more aggressive braking in the wet.......
YOU SHOULD GET AN NC30 THEY HAVE LOTS OF ENGINE BRAKEING AND ARE A GOOD WET WEATHER BIKE. THEY CAME WITH "HRC" PAINT JOBS WHICH LOOK GOOD AND WOULD SUIT YOU AS "HRC" STANDS FOR HINDU RACING CORPORATION

Big Dave
6th June 2005, 18:09
I havent really pushed to see where the sliding point is, I really need to just get out in the rain more and get use to it. :weird:

Fair enough - most of the people I have seen come to grief in the wet have 'frozen' or grabbed a handful of picks when things started to get loose.

many times if you just roll with it and react smoothly - traction can be regained - particularly on the shiny black patches. if you tense up it just gets worse.

thats why being comfortable sliding a dirt bike can help - you don't go 'oh shit' when there is that lateral movement.

fwiw I like lighting up the back in the wet and hanging it out a bit every now and then - like i was on the dirt. it's why ABS doesn't appeal to me at all either

Zed
6th June 2005, 18:12
Well I will happily admit there is a hole in my ability, or you could say Im coward.
I know the subject has been covered before but I just thought I would ask the question. Yesterday I was on the Coro loop ride, first half of the ride was fine, it was dry etc. The secondhalf, basically back down to Kopu it was wet. Im a big fat wuss and so I slowed right up, (partially due to not riding the new bike much in the wet wasnt sure what to expect) Im planning to get out in the wet a lot over the next few weeks and get some pratice, I DONT wanna become just a summer rider etc. Realistically its just coinfidence thing but as we came down into Kopu
(a) I was tired. (b) I had got out of sync, if that makes sense. (c) I had a dark visor on and thought I was in a full on thunderstorm. (Removing visor)
So how do you guys do it? Anything I should try?I'm no fan of riding in the wet, but I have found that experience in doing it will definately bring improvements to your style and increase your confidence levels! I have to concentrate nearly twice as much on the road in the wet and make sure my lines into and around corners are super smooth. Having your tyres up to scratch is also a biggie! :yes:

I also wear a rubber finger-wipe on my left index finger in the wet so I can keep my visor clear - big help! Bought it from Red Baron.

Motoracer
6th June 2005, 18:13
Just practice practice practice and really learn to be super smooth. That's what everyone will tell you over and over again and that's all there is to it.

Ixion
6th June 2005, 18:34
Took Li'l Rat Bike for a wee tootle up the back roads to Helensville (nice little run, founf a bit of gravel just for interest - pushed the little fella up to 140kph for a bit, but he wasn't really happy at that. That's OK I'm happy to nana along.) on Sunday after werk. Shitty as weather, and I found the wet adhesion limits of BT45's . Not as high as I'd hoped, but at least when they do let go seems like it's quite gentle, just a squeejit squeejit, and an urgent message "Cap'n, we cann'a hold it back here, shes gonna blow"

I like riding in the rain (well, all right I don't actually LIKE riding in the rain, but once I'm home I like HAVING ridden in the rain, if you know what I mean)

Generally the rear end on most bikes just squizzles a bit when the rear gets to it's limits in the wet. More scarey than dangerous. Like people say, try riding a bit on wet clay, so you get the feel of a slippery wheel breaking out.

Only time I get the shits in the rain is when you're following a cage through a corner (isn't it odd that even on a tiddy little 250, in the rain, there's always a cage holding you up) and the cage gets a scare and jams the brakes on mid corner. What to do, what to do ?

Flyingpony
6th June 2005, 18:40
Practise and experience.

I'm not afraid of losing the rear, at least not with my 20hp on tap.
What I'm terrified about is losing the front and having a close encounter with the tarseal.

How can I safely discover the grip limit of the front tyre (dry and wet road) without hurting myself or the bike?

loosebruce
7th June 2005, 02:54
Hey Kawa, I'm pretty confident in the wet, enough so to enjoy it, dont be to worried bout that part of the road into kopu in the wet, it's a shocker and pretty dangerous in places, I've ridden 25 more than any other road round so i know it pretty well, but i back off in a big way around that area, many a the back end went thataway moments and whoa where did the front go. There is very little grip round there at the best of times, so dont worry too much.
Pick roads you know well when learning to ride quicker in the wet, know whats coming, tar snakes on road, corners that thighten, it's all relative, use that knowledge to choose your lines in the wet, be smooth and it will come.
There is still a surpirsing amount of grip available in wet conditions, so many things count to that grip though, smoothness, progressive but frim braking, smooth accelarating, good tyres and heat in them, right frame of mind and so on...... it's a learning curve dont rush it though.

Good way to learn, get to the track if it rains still go out, dont be soft, you'll come out better off for it.

Lou Girardin
7th June 2005, 08:20
(a) I was tired. (b) I had got out of sync, if that makes sense. (c) I had a dark visor on and thought I was in a full on thunderstorm. (Removing visor)
So how do you guys do it? Anything I should try?

Three real good reasons to slow down. If you're not feeling up to speed, don't try and push it or it'll end in tears. Carry a spare visor too.

scumdog
7th June 2005, 08:36
Slow down, watch for water-filled pot-holes (ya dunno how deep the might be) and if possible try not to get too wet/cold, you start to lose you 'edge' if you do.

Best tip? LOTS of space between you and whatevers on front of you, even if it's a real slow cage just drop back for a bit until you get a GOOD passing spot - after all, what is so urgent you need to risk a bin or can't be a couple of minutes late for????

Motu
7th June 2005, 09:00
I'm not too embarassed to go slow in the wet,I'd rather get to where I'm going than somewhere I don't want to go.As mentioned smooth is the key word,and increase the distance to the cars in front...and behind,everyones stopping distance is increased...shift your awareness much further out in ALL directions and plan escape routes continuously.

That said even on knobs I am able to take corners 5 kph above posted speed in the wet and pass most cars,a slip in the wet at 120kph is a scary wake up call,but you are usually out of the danger zone before anything nasty happens - with your experiance on dirt you should know your bike will stay upright even when slidding,although without a 21 up front you have less natural forces helping you.....one of the reasons I am reluctant to give up the 21in front wheels,they come into play when you loose contact with the ground.

Ixion
7th June 2005, 09:11
One thing to watch in the wet is other vehicles (trucks are the worst of course) throwing a wall of water over you. It can be disconcerting when you suddenly lose visibility.

vifferman
7th June 2005, 09:29
One thing you mentioned was how tired you were. Something that will help is trying to relax. Once you've got some basics like decent visibility from a clear visor sorted out, sort your mental attitude out. Tell yourself, "There's more grip available than I think there is" and notice that even though you're scared about slipping, there's actually not much (if any) of that going on. Check your grip on the bars: chances are, you're holding them too tight because you're worried about sliding, and this is inhibiting a smooth, safe style because you're so tense and stiff. Remember, unless you're a Rossi, the bike's much more capable than you are.

I was (and often still am) like this, until I did a fine weather ride that turned wet. I was then scared I was going to fall off, until I missed a turn and had to speed up to catch the guy I was following. I noticed the bike wasn't misbehaving in the wet at all, and so I relaxed HEAPS.

speeding_ant
12th October 2005, 20:02
Problem is, with a touchy bike like an RG150, its hard to be smooth. Riding in the rain is hard, therefore, ride like a nana, thats what I do!

Biff
13th October 2005, 01:40
You're doing nothing wrong mate. Take your time, the rain is not a friend.

Softly, softly catchie monkey - or something like that.

My 2c - http://www.kiwibiker.co.nz/forums/showthread.php?t=18451&highlight=riding+rain

Zapf
18th October 2005, 18:07
hang off more into the corner... in that way you have to lean the bike less and hence less chance of a slide...

2_SL0
18th October 2005, 18:55
Im a happy camper in the wet these days, the winter helped in that aspect.
:niceone:

Unit
6th November 2005, 09:14
Ahhh, the wet, soooo much more to think about. Trying not to focus on the dribbles running down the visor (shit, thats right, watch the road). Then theres the water slowly leeking down my top, inside my boots, and I revisit the last time it was wet and those roundtoit jobs regarding weatherproofing my gear, now its dribbling down the back of my arse... shit, corner upon me, dumbarse cage drivers aiming for the biggest puddles to drench riders with, (socks now socking wet which means I cant take my boots off when I arrive where Im going cause I wont get them back on). Oh well, at least cleaning my bike will be half done. Hell, Im only doing 50kms, there's bloody traffic behind me, power on, forget the wet socks, did I ask the shop about that new back tyre in the wet? Cant remember. Oh well, hot bath when I get home.
NO time to be busy being afraid, but oh the look, a drowned rat with helmet hair :crybaby:

Ixion
6th November 2005, 09:18
Boots leaking, socks wet ? You need GAITERS. From your friendly local army surplus store , $12.50, cheap for dry feet.

Lou Girardin
7th November 2005, 08:37
Boots leaking, socks wet ? You need GAITERS. From your friendly local army surplus store , $12.50, cheap for dry feet.

Or even waterproof boots.

terbang
8th November 2005, 18:56
Another thing worth keeping an eye out for is the oil contaminate in the centre of each lane that is laid there by cages with leaky drive chains (Engine Gearbox & diff). Its allways there and you can see it if you look closely. This can give you a few little heart flutters as you shift line on your side of the road especially when it rains after a long dry spell. I once nearly came to grief on a corner in the wet in close proximity to a dead possum. The possum had been there a while and was fairly well decomposed (stinkin a bit) I changed line avoiding the carcass however I suspect a larger area of the road was affected by fat or other seeping from it. A fairly unpleasant slide and a damn near low side to highside saw me recoveing in the opposite lane! Very ugly to all witnesses & thank god no oncoming traffic..! I also keep an eye on tractors working in adjacent paddocks as they often transit from paddock to paddock via the road and their heavily treaded tyres tend to lay a nice trail of wet mud that I once saw a mate of mine get more than his fair share of adrenalin over. There aint no such thing as a wet and miserable ride, only bad riding gear and riding in the rain is a challenging experience that needs to be trod very carefully.:spudbn:

Ixion
8th November 2005, 20:26
Or even waterproof boots.

Figment of the imagination.

Lou Girardin
9th November 2005, 07:09
Figment of the imagination.

My imaginary feet stay nice and dry though.:banana:

SlowHand
10th November 2005, 09:15
So how is it going Mr. Kawagreen? I think I saw you on the southern m/way - you were riding pretty slow and careful, also the bike looked a bit wonky? Is it broken?

2_SL0
10th November 2005, 17:39
Hmmm, were u behind me the other day when I had that "moment". Couldnt of been you the bike behind me didnt have space savers on:buggerd:

R1madness
21st November 2005, 06:31
Wet weather riding is a fact of life for us southern bikers. Just get on the bike and do the k's ride normally but give yourself a bit of an extra safty margin when braking turning and accleletating. Just be smooth and try to keep it flowing. There is nothing like doing a full day ride in a storm. Its amaising the confidence you have when you get to your destination. And the looks of concern from fellow road users as you pull in for gas, chug a coffee and say ......... na mate its a great day for riding and then get on the bike and go ....... its funny as hell.

heavenly.talker
21st November 2005, 07:47
If it's wet or if you are feeling a little warning system that you shouldn't be pushing it then first and foremost dial back the throttle some.
Second, increase your following distance (if something does go pear shaped you will have more time and room to make decisions).
Stick in either the left hand or right hand tyre grooves of other cars as much as you can (some rain brings up the oil and shite on the road up to the surface). This will also tend to be the dryest line so tyres have a little more grip.
Try and avoid the white paint on the road. Adjust your riding up and stopping positions. Never (well try not to anyway) put your foot down on the white stuff in the wet as it is then that bikers often go for a wee slide.
If you're tired or uneasy...stop. There is no shame in pulling up and enjoying a coffee to wait out the worst of it.
Remember Cagers are even worse in the rain!

Riding is not about getting to the destination...it's also about enjoying the journey.

clint640
21st November 2005, 09:01
Good comments above, one thing I might add is that you might want to use a bit more back brake than usual, as in any low traction situation.

Has anyone heard those amazingly dumbass 'lose your confidence, save your life' radio ads that try to impress on people that they are 'powerless against a wet road' WTF!! I would like to think that things like decent tyres, skill, experience & an appropriate speed for the conditions actually make quite a difference. I know my (albeit limited) dirt riding skills have saved my ass on a slippery road more than once.

It's right up there with the 'THINK SLOW' :weird: billboard I saw in Napier a while back.

Cheers
Clint

Highlander
4th December 2005, 12:56
Good comments above, one thing I might add is that you might want to use a bit more back brake than usual, as in any low traction situation.


I read somewhere (may have been elsewhere on KB even) that lightly starting the rear brake first is the ticket in the wet.
I have tried it (cautiously) a couple of times and it seems to work.