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Thread: The Mosquito lives!

  1. #76
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    THe glues that was developed for the Mossie - isn't that what was ultimately marketed to the public as Araldite?
    it's not a bad thing till you throw a KLR into the mix.
    those cheap ass bitches can do anything with ductape.
    (PostalDave on ADVrider)

  2. #77
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    you could make a strong argument that Rolls Royce won the war ,they always fronted up with more power when required.One of the main reasons the spitfire flew for the whole war,it always had a competitive power output

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by BMWST? View Post
    you could make a strong argument that Rolls Royce won the war ,they always fronted up with more power when required.One of the main reasons the spitfire flew for the whole war,it always had a competitive power output
    If that is the case then ironic that RR are now German owned
    it's not a bad thing till you throw a KLR into the mix.
    those cheap ass bitches can do anything with ductape.
    (PostalDave on ADVrider)

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by pete376403 View Post
    THe glues that was developed for the Mossie - isn't that what was ultimately marketed to the public as Araldite?
    not aradite as far as I know thats is an epoxy resin.
    The mozys used a urea-formaldehyde glue called Resorcinol glue
    It was one of the first synthetic glues.
    from what I understand it smells rather pungent not at all like an expoxy.
    The glue according to all I have seen is what they use for plywood still.



    aye.......
    Quote Originally Posted by Katman View Post
    I reminder distinctly .




    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

  5. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katman View Post
    I reminder distinctly .




    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

  6. #81
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-fo7SmNuUU4
    pretty impressive how the poms organised semi skilled civillians and turned out beautiful engines in such numbers. check out all the measures that were taken to maintain quality... and didn't it pay off for all of us (sorry Heinrech and co)

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by BMWST? View Post
    you could make a strong argument that Rolls Royce won the war ,they always fronted up with more power when required.One of the main reasons the spitfire flew for the whole war,it always had a competitive power output

    that and a little help from from high octane fuel

    The secret fuel that made the Spitfire supreme

    13 May 2009

    In the year that sees the 70th anniversary of the outbreak of the Second World War, a previously untold story has emerged of how, through a "miracle" chemical breakthrough, Spitfire and Hurricane fighters gained the edge over German fighters to win the Battle of Britain.

    An American scientist and author has claimed that the famed pair of war-winning aeroplanes gained superior altitude, manoeuvrability and rate of climb by a revolutionary high-octane fuel supplied to Britain by the USA just in time for the battle.

    Books, documentaries, and movies have chronicled the brilliant contribution of UK designers and engineers behind the legendary fighter planes that won the Battle of Britain, preventing invasion of the British Isles.

    The courage and sacrifice of RAF pilots who flew the aeroplanes is rightly celebrated and their bravery has become an inspirational chapter of the British national story.

    What has not been known until now, however, is the story of the revolutionary aviation fuel supplied to the RAF by an American company, using a process invented by a Frenchman, without which Spitfires and Hurricanes might not have achieved crucial dominance over the Luftwaffe.

    The Royal Society of Chemistry read the claims about Eugene Houdry, and his process at the Sun Oil Company, in a paper written originally for the journal Invention and Technology by American science writer Tim Palucka.

    The introduction to the paper by Palucka says of Houdry: "His miraculous catalyst turned nearly worthless sludge into precious high-octane gasoline and helped the Allies to win World War II."

    He continued: "That process would make a crucial difference in mid-1940 when the Royal Air Force started filling its Spitfires and Hurricanes with the 100-octane gasoline imported from the United States instead of the 87-octane gasoline it had formerly used."

    The RSC is inviting experts and the public to challenge the new claim and if it remains intact then the society will send the report to aviation and military historians to mark the newly-discovered contribution of chemists to victory in one of the key battles.

    Eugene Houdry, born in France, developed, after settling in the USA, one of the earliest catalysts to convert useless crude oil into high octane fuel. He revealed the "cracking" process at a Chicago chemicals conference in 1938

    The 100-octane fuel that resulted from the Houdry Process increased the Spitfire's speed by 25 mph at sea level by 34 mph at 10,000 feet.

    This extra speed gave the British fighters in the summer of 1940 the edge over the Luftwaffe above the English Channel and in the skies of London and south-east England.

    With the balance tipped towards the British, the German invasion was abandoned and Hitler turned eastwards, allowing the UK armed forces time to regroup and to revive.

    "Luftwaffe pilots couldn't believe they were facing the same planes they had fought successfully over France a few months before. The planes were the same but the fuel wasn't," said Palucka.

    Tim Palucka says that in the 1943 book The Amazing Petroleum Industry, V A Kalichevsky of the Socony-Vacuum Oil Company explained what high-octane gasoline meant to Britain. Kalichevsky wrote:

    "It is an established fact that a difference of only 13 points in octane number made possible the defeat of the Luftwaffe by the RAF in the fall of 1940. This difference, slight as its seems, is sufficient to give a plane the vital edge in altitude, rate of climb and manoeuvrability that spells the difference between defeat and victory.

    Contact and Further Information
    Press Office
    Royal Society of Chemistry, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BA
    Tel: +44 (0)1223 432294
    Fax: +44 (0)1223 426594
    Email: Press Office

  8. #83
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    Was talking to a WW2 hurricane pilot who said that the advantage of the Hurricane was that it could turn tighter than the opposition. "Pilots don't like a 'plane that can turn tighter than theirs."

    If you do the thing with your hands, following hand turning tighter, you willl instantly see why.
    There is a grey blur, and a green blur. I try to stay on the grey one. - Joey Dunlop

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by pritch View Post
    Was talking to a WW2 hurricane pilot who said that the advantage of the Hurricane was that it could turn tighter than the opposition. "Pilots don't like a 'plane that can turn tighter than theirs."

    If you do the thing with your hands, following hand turning tighter, you willl instantly see why.
    You've been watching too much TOP GUN. Hurricanes were better at the ground attack support role.

    They were slower than other fighters and had a smaller turning circle. Not unlike our old Skyhawks dog fighting with F16s, which they would piss all over at lower speed maneuvers.

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by pritch View Post
    Was talking to a WW2 hurricane pilot who said that the advantage of the Hurricane was that it could turn tighter than the opposition. "Pilots don't like a 'plane that can turn tighter than theirs."

    If you do the thing with your hands, following hand turning tighter, you willl instantly see why.
    More planes were shot down in the BOB by hurricanes a wooden and fabric plane build.

    In fact more German aircraft in the BOB were shot down by hawker hurricanes than all other British aircraft combined
    They were more numerous and cheaper.
    For the poms Speed wasn't an issue as the radar Put them above the enemy up in the sun rather than climbing to meet them.
    Radar meant the crews didn't burn fuel or fatigue the pilots loitering in the sky waiting for attacks.
    A hurricane however as the Merlin had carbs was more prone to stall than the Fuel injected ME.

    The hurricanes also had better armour.
    Also at the start twice as many guns 8 vs 4 then the spitfire.
    Last edited by husaberg; 20th September 2020 at 12:40. Reason: add a fat that more genman aircraft were shot down by the huricane than all otyher britidh aircraft combined
    Quote Originally Posted by Katman View Post
    I reminder distinctly .




    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by pritch View Post
    Was talking to a WW2 hurricane pilot who said that the advantage of the Hurricane was that it could turn tighter than the opposition. "Pilots don't like a 'plane that can turn tighter than theirs."

    If you do the thing with your hands, following hand turning tighter, you willl instantly see why.
    Dont be silly, fancy asking a pilot about aircraft flight characteristics. As if he would know. You need to ask an ex airforce stores person , they know everything, especially about planes that existed before they were born. And when they have finished mocking your pilots statement, they will say exactly what he said - turn tighter ... smaller turning circle
    it's not a bad thing till you throw a KLR into the mix.
    those cheap ass bitches can do anything with ductape.
    (PostalDave on ADVrider)

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by husaberg View Post
    More planes were shot down in the BOB by hurricanes
    Funny thing, I don't remember reading anything about Hurricanes in the ground attack role during the Battle of Britain. There's probably a reason for that though.
    There is a grey blur, and a green blur. I try to stay on the grey one. - Joey Dunlop

  13. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by pritch View Post
    Funny thing, I don't remember reading anything about Hurricanes in the ground attack role during the Battle of Britain. There's probably a reason for that though.
    Neither do I?
    Its odd in that the Hurricane shot down more German aircraft in the BOB than all other British aircraft combined, so to suggest it wasn't a fighter would bea special kind of stupid in the extreme.
    Is there anyone that stupid on KB?
    Quote Originally Posted by Katman View Post
    I reminder distinctly .




    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by pritch View Post
    Funny thing, I don't remember reading anything about Hurricanes in the ground attack role during the Battle of Britain. There's probably a reason for that though.
    The "Battle of Britain" was fought OVER England remember. In defense as opposed to attack. England was (in most places) FRIENDLY territory. Ground attacks on friendly territory was frowned on in those days.

    Not so much in later years ..
    Sweat wipes off. Road-rash doesn't.

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by husaberg View Post
    Neither do I?
    Why would the British need ground attack aircraft with bombs over London to fight an air defense battle in the sky above England ... ??

    England had not been invaded. What do you think the could have bombed ... ??

    Quote Originally Posted by husaberg View Post
    Is there anyone that stupid on KB?
    From what you posted above ... Apparently ...
    Sweat wipes off. Road-rash doesn't.

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