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Thread: Slippery roads

  1. #16
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    13th November 2011 - 15:32
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasonu View Post
    I'm thinking you're twisting the go grip a bit too much for the conditions.
    On a single cylinder 300 going 100km/h that's about 40km/h off top speed on a good day. I wasn't accelerating just maintaining speed.

    Anyway, skids are always cool.

  2. #17
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    7th September 2009 - 09:47
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    Quote Originally Posted by haydes55 View Post
    .

    Anyway, skids are always cool.
    Tru dat sista!!!

  3. #18
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    I've looked but can't see what the tyre is. That is a key piece of information. The shiny tar patches are slippery, that's not rocket science, but some tyres handle it better than others.
    There is a grey blur, and a green blur. I try to stay on the grey one. - Joey Dunlop

  4. #19
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    24th April 2011 - 08:47
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    Slippery when wet signs point to caution and the fact that they are never going to fix the problem.

    Someone mentioned things to watch for, but failed to mention " Anything painted on the road", that'll tip ya off. Avoid painted surfaces. Oh yeah .... and cyclists in lycra, ... very slippery stuff.

    Pilot road 4's very popular down South, tar through the surface is very common and can be like ice in the wet, not so easy to avoid when it';s right across the road, caused by heavy vehicles on poorly sealed roads = tank slappers even at low speeds. Good idea to think about control of a slide, 9 times out of 10, the bike will correct itself if you allow it to i.e don't panic Mr Manering. If you close the throttle too quickly, you run the risk of the rear tire regaining traction too quickly. If you counter-steer too much, you risk over-correction. Like riding on gravel, relax the grip, the bike’s trail will actually cause it to naturally steer into a slide for you, really you do nothing. Don't touch the brakes, best left for when the bike is upright, and then in the wet braking gently.My old Triumph has pathetic brakes (albeit the same Lockheed ones fitted to airplanes) in the wet and I mostly use motor braking.
    If you’re hanging off the bike, allow it to move around freely underneath you while you hold your body relatively still. This helps the bike “find” the right direction to go in. A good place to learn this throttle control is in a paddock on a trail bike. Or if ya got balls on a speedway bike LOL.

    Like cornering just look where you want to go (if you have time), focus on where you want to be and your subtle body movements in response will help the bike find its way there and reduce the skid effect in your cleanest of undies.
    "If you ever need anything please donít hesitate to ask someone else first.Ē


    Welcome "Guest", please enjoy the wedding.

  5. #20
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    21st December 2006 - 14:36
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    Quote Originally Posted by granstar View Post
    Pilot road 4's very popular down South, tar through the surface is very common and can be like ice in the wet, not so easy to avoid when it's right across the road
    This is exactly why I decided to try the PR4s; one fishtail too many right before a corner that put me squarely on the wrong side of the road. I've done the same corner in the same conditions many times since and the PR4s simply won't let go. On to my second front and third rear now and won't wear anything else (on the wheels, get your minds out of the gutter). Not only do they grip very well they also last like nothing I've used before - near 30k out of the front and around 15k on the rear.
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (1706-90)

    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending to much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826)

    "Motorcycling is not inherently dangerous. It is, however, EXTREMELY unforgiving of inattention, ignorance, incompetence and stupidity!" - Anonymous

    "Live to Ride, Ride to Live"

  6. #21
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    24th August 2007 - 11:31
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    Quote Originally Posted by swbarnett View Post
    This is exactly why I decided to try the PR4s; one fishtail too many right before a corner that put me squarely on the wrong side of the road. I've done the same corner in the same conditions many times since and the PR4s simply won't let go. On to my second front and third rear now and won't wear anything else (on the wheels, get your minds out of the gutter). Not only do they grip very well they also last like nothing I've used before - near 30k out of the front and around 15k on the rear.
    15. Thousand. Kilometers. I am tipping my hat. I just got a lifetime record of 2800 kilometres out of a pair of Pirelli Gumboots. I mean, Pirelli GT Angels. However, most of that was in the South Island and they have many long straight bits. Just put running shoes back on the bike, went for a gentle ride today to scrub the release agent from the tire, and the bike is already feeling much happier to turn (Pirelli Super Corsas). Like my women, I like tyres that are here for a good time, and not a long time.
    Itís diametrically opposed to the sanitised existence of the Lemmings around me in the Dilbert Cartoon hell I live in; itís life at full volume, perfect colour with high resolution and 10,000 watts of amplification.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by granstar View Post
    Slippery when wet signs point to caution and the fact that they are never going to fix the problem.

    Someone mentioned things to watch for, but failed to mention " Anything painted on the road", that'll tip ya off. Avoid painted surfaces. Oh yeah .... and cyclists in lycra, ... very slippery stuff.

    Good idea to think about control of a slide, 9 times out of 10, the bike will correct itself if you allow it to i.e don't panic Mr Manering. If you close the throttle too quickly, you run the risk of the rear tire regaining traction too quickly. If you counter-steer too much, you risk over-correction. Like riding on gravel, relax the grip, the bikeís trail will actually cause it to naturally steer into a slide for you, really you do nothing.
    Be kind to cyclists, one less cage on the road and all that.

    Agree with most of the above hastily edited from the post above. CSS calls it the survival reaction, when the bike slides you automatically shut the throttle. But, as per above, this ends badly. Like when you ask your misses for a threesome with her BFF and she reacts badly - an ambulance ride is in your near future. With more power, you can have fun with slides - but your job on a little bike is to learn to not transfer weight suddenly at the wrong time. You can brake deep in a corner (trail braking), but this is a Jedi skill that takes time to master. You can slide the bike by using power or weight, but again it's a Jedi skill that takes time to master.

    Recommend you find some good mentors in your area and get some advice. Smooth is good. Experience is good. Ambulance rides are bad. Drugs are bad, mmmkay.
    Itís diametrically opposed to the sanitised existence of the Lemmings around me in the Dilbert Cartoon hell I live in; itís life at full volume, perfect colour with high resolution and 10,000 watts of amplification.

  8. #23
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    2nd February 2008 - 15:59
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    Quote Originally Posted by swbarnett View Post
    I travel that stretch of road daily. Last week I had exactly the same thing happen in exactly the same spot. I had just wound open the throttle at the time. Instinctual closing of the throttle got the rear to re-grip and all was back tonormal. The funny thing is that it didn't worry me at all. I've had the back skip out enough times over the last few decades (tyres in the '80s didn't have the grip they do today) that I'm kind of used to it..

    oh yeh...... wonder how some of the 'wannaberossi's' on there sprotty's would get on with a pair of TT100's or 'speedmasters' on the bike
    If the road to hell is paved with good intentions; and a man is judged by his deeds and his actions, why say it's the thought that counts? -GrayWolf

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by madbikeboy View Post
    15. Thousand. Kilometers. I am tipping my hat. I just got a lifetime record of 2800 kilometres out of a pair of Pirelli Gumboots. I mean, Pirelli GT Angels. However, most of that was in the South Island and they have many long straight bits. Just put running shoes back on the bike, went for a gentle ride today to scrub the release agent from the tire, and the bike is already feeling much happier to turn (Pirelli Super Corsas). Like my women, I like tyres that are here for a good time, and not a long time.
    My bike is my primary transport. A fair number of those 15k were Auckland's motorway.

    I'm not a Rossi wannabe by any means so I'm happy with a slightly less sporty tyre that I don't have to change every 5 weeks.
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (1706-90)

    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending to much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826)

    "Motorcycling is not inherently dangerous. It is, however, EXTREMELY unforgiving of inattention, ignorance, incompetence and stupidity!" - Anonymous

    "Live to Ride, Ride to Live"

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by madbikeboy View Post
    15. Thousand. Kilometers. I am tipping my hat. I just got a lifetime record of 2800 kilometres out of a pair of Pirelli Gumboots. I mean, Pirelli GT Angels.
    Fifteen is good I don't think I've had that from a sport touring tyre. If I get 12 or 13 I'm happy, and I got that from my Pirelli Angels although I never tried the GTs because I didn't have a "heavy" bike.

    Is the OP ever going to tell us what his new tyre is?
    There is a grey blur, and a green blur. I try to stay on the grey one. - Joey Dunlop

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by pritch View Post
    Fifteen is good I don't think I've had that from a sport touring tyre. If I get 12 or 13 I'm happy,
    I got 16,494km from my first rear, 15,756 from the second (must've been a bit more aggressive on that one). Just passing 11k on the third with plenty of tread left.

    I used to get around 10 or 11 out of anything previous on this bike (12 or 13 if I forgot about it and ran it past legal).
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (1706-90)

    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending to much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826)

    "Motorcycling is not inherently dangerous. It is, however, EXTREMELY unforgiving of inattention, ignorance, incompetence and stupidity!" - Anonymous

    "Live to Ride, Ride to Live"

  12. #27
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    15th January 2011 - 20:51
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    So many of our main roads are in a dangerous condition because they chip seal has worn out. But this is never stated to be a factor in accidents, although a coroner did include it as a cause of a Dome Valley fatality.

    Like many cost saving measures, I expect that the cost of the resulting serious accidents outweighs the savings. But as it's almost never recognised as a factor in accidents, so how do we know?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

  13. #28
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    24th August 2007 - 11:31
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    Quote Originally Posted by pritch View Post
    Fifteen is good I don't think I've had that from a sport touring tyre. If I get 12 or 13 I'm happy, and I got that from my Pirelli Angels although I never tried the GTs because I didn't have a "heavy" bike.

    Is the OP ever going to tell us what his new tyre is?
    So, the Pirelli Super Corsa is amazing for grip, and it's wicked on the edge of adhesion. But, long life, not so much. I did a Coro loop this week (ended up in Whangamata for the Hop on Friday). The ride there was pretty good. The ride home was all about tyre conservation. Bye SC, I'll miss you so. Two tanks of gas, 94 gas station meat pies, one Whangamata Pizza, one back tyre, zero speeding tickets. Priceless.

    What an amazing difference between the Angels and the SC's though - the Angels are very dead feeling, the bike is slow to steer. With the larger 200 and sticky rubber, the Hayabusa feels more like a obese GSXR1000 (albeit one with less rev's, the rev limit is like 75,000 RPM less than a thou, bloody annoying).
    Itís diametrically opposed to the sanitised existence of the Lemmings around me in the Dilbert Cartoon hell I live in; itís life at full volume, perfect colour with high resolution and 10,000 watts of amplification.

  14. #29
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    23rd February 2007 - 08:47
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    Interesting. I love the angel GTs on my Busa. Probably you are right about a lack of feeling when pushed. Certainly a different feeling bike to my GSXR 600 on S21s. I have spent a fair bit on my Busa,s suspension, which helps control, but in the end, you can't hide from the size and weight of the old girl.

  15. #30
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    24th August 2007 - 11:31
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVboy View Post
    Interesting. I love the angel GTs on my Busa. Probably you are right about a lack of feeling when pushed. Certainly a different feeling bike to my GSXR 600 on S21s. I have spent a fair bit on my Busa,s suspension, which helps control, but in the end, you can't hide from the size and weight of the old girl.
    What upgrades have you done to the suspension? I recently yanked the forks and serviced them, dropped the oil weight a step. Made a positive difference. Was considering an Ohlins upgrade for the rear...

    The exhaust is 20 odd kg's alone. The tail section is near enough to 45 kgs. I've ridden a couple of modded second gen's with thou tails, and it makes a difference. Hard to gauge how much difference because both were modded with turbo kits.
    Itís diametrically opposed to the sanitised existence of the Lemmings around me in the Dilbert Cartoon hell I live in; itís life at full volume, perfect colour with high resolution and 10,000 watts of amplification.

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