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Thread: The Bucket Foundry

  1. #4081
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    Quote Originally Posted by WilDun View Post
    Wasn't it a Swedish inline 4 (fore & aft)?
    Wash your mouth out, it was a Danish 4
    Compare Pornography now to 50 years ago.
    Then extrapolate 50 years into the future.
    . . . That shit's Nasty.

  2. #4082
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    Quote Originally Posted by diesel pig View Post
    Wash your mouth out, it was a Danish 4
    Well, we all make mistakes! ... first & last from Denmark?
    Strokers Galore!

  3. #4083
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    Well, not being able to match the size of Flettos furnace, have been working on getting mine set up.

    Essentially a throw out from the local university, the main bits were already there. The I is 310 and O is 560, making for a chunky unit. The crucible I have is of 8 kg Copper capacity. Have been making up the lifting tongs to suit this. Will be LPG fired, using a 9 kg bottle. The wheeled unit, which I have been working on for years also has a vacuum pump (aka a fridge compressor- cheap and effective) fir degassing both plaster and also metal, should I ever get round to it.

    As an aside, doing the usual YouTube vid searches on casting stuff, I found one (or a series) that may be of some interest.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkE...3aEW8vSGhlB43g. He calls himself the VegOilGuy, and has quite a coverage on casting small stuff. Despite being a Pom, he is quite interesting.

    Old mate on 2 stroke stuffing is now getting into Nikasil plating: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0tVwQMWcso

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    Sorry about the 90 deg rotation, but that just happens it seems.
    "Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm.

  4. #4084
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    Here's the promised pictures of the YD24 carb and the final bit of mixed media to finish the MotoBi project:

    Showing the down draft relative to the float:
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    View of the float and jets
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    view of the slide and "needle"
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    Design of ideal bell that doubles as air filter adaptor
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    Bell SLS printed in Nylon. The quality and design freedom of SLS make the home printers look like toys, but each tool has its place.
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  5. #4085
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    The home printers are fun toys. You can still make useful plastic parts that are good for experimenting. They are a good introduction to the world of additive manufacturing and can complement older technologies like sand and investment casting as are being explored by the forum members.

    Lohring Miller

  6. #4086
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    [QUOTE=OopsClunkThud;1131129869]Here's the promised pictures of the YD24 carb and the final bit of mixed media to finish the MotoBi project:

    Showing the down draft relative to the float:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    View of the float and jets
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    Interesting...the idle jet is on the side closest to the bore - or what would be the "downhill" side.
    Presumably that was thought important enough to warrant casting a body with a "level" float chamber.

  7. #4087
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    New indoor foundry facility fired up for the first time yesterday. A few heat cycles, then into it. First off some 125 cylinders. At @//^&^ ing last!

  8. #4088
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flettner View Post
    New indoor foundry facility fired up for the first time yesterday. A few heat cycles, then into it. First off some 125 cylinders. At @//^&^ ing last!
    Hope you've still got a camera man hovering around in the background!
    Strokers Galore!

  9. #4089
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken seeber View Post
    Well, not being able to match the size of Fletto’s furnace, have been working on getting mine set up.

    Essentially a throw out from the local university, the main bits were already there.
    Very interested in how they constructed the inner ring/hardface ……… If I make another one, I might try that - might take a lot of expansion stresses away (heating and cooling) and prevent the usual ugly cracks! - obviously it would be good from the point of view of producing them in a factory and probably why that type of construction was employed in this case. ……. like it.
    Strokers Galore!

  10. #4090
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    20th January 2010 - 14:41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grumph View Post
    Here's the promised pictures of the YD24 carb and the final bit of mixed media to finish the MotoBi project:

    Showing the down draft relative to the float:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    View of the float and jets
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    Interesting...the idle jet is on the side closest to the bore - or what would be the "downhill" side.
    Presumably that was thought important enough to warrant casting a body with a "level" float chamber.
    I am confused by your post Greg? Previously you have mentioned the Dellottos allowing a bigger downdraft where is their Pilot outlet? and entry?
    Quote Originally Posted by Katman View Post
    I reminder distinctly .




    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

  11. #4091
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    12th March 2010 - 16:56
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    ok, several heat cycles done, out side fuel shut off valve installed, you know, safety and all that��. Crucibal trolley modified, I guess I need to make up some molds now.

  12. #4092
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    Quote Originally Posted by husaberg View Post
    I am confused by your post Greg? Previously you have mentioned the Dellottos allowing a bigger downdraft where is their Pilot outlet? and entry?
    Dellortos and various others incl the Mk1 Concentric have the idle jet on the air intake side of the carb. That Yosh carb looks to have the idle jet on the engine side - just like the old VM mikuni. The VM starts to leak fuel via the idle circuit at about 15 deg inclination. The Yosh carb won't cos the bowl stays level with an inclined throat.
    Both types of idle circuit have the outlet on the engine side of the slide - as it must be to work.
    But where it draws from is the deciding factor in the angle at which it will work correctly.

    The old VM, tilted past 15 deg, has both the jet and the outlet below the level of fuel in the bowl - and it simply runs downhill.

    I'm speculating that the Yosh carb was made that way to be more sensitive to idle vacuum. The market for them is the small flat singles of 50 - 90cc which would be very poor starters with a big carb - and low intake vacuum signal. The shorter length of the idle circuit with the jet on the engine side probably makes them easier to tune.

  13. #4093
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grumph View Post
    Dellortos and various others incl the Mk1 Concentric have the idle jet on the air intake side of the carb. That Yosh carb looks to have the idle jet on the engine side - just like the old VM mikuni. The VM starts to leak fuel via the idle circuit at about 15 deg inclination. The Yosh carb won't cos the bowl stays level with an inclined throat.
    Both types of idle circuit have the outlet on the engine side of the slide - as it must be to work.
    But where it draws from is the deciding factor in the angle at which it will work correctly.

    The old VM, tilted past 15 deg, has both the jet and the outlet below the level of fuel in the bowl - and it simply runs downhill.

    I'm speculating that the Yosh carb was made that way to be more sensitive to idle vacuum. The market for them is the small flat singles of 50 - 90cc which would be very poor starters with a big carb - and low intake vacuum signal. The shorter length of the idle circuit with the jet on the engine side probably makes them easier to tune.
    Looking at the pics the idle jet air intake to me looks on the bellmouth side of the slide?

    Post a pic of the Stinger carbs you have i are trying to remember how they are?
    i think they are just the same as the YD carb just 45 degrees tilted more
    those yoshi carbs have those holey jet needles that are meant to atomise the fuel better that no one seems to have copied.
    According to them
    The conventional jet needle type carb does draw the fuel through its gap between needle jet and Jet needle to main bore when even throttle valves are fully closed vs. with MJN nozzle fuel drawing is very minimum. Let’s image, you are entering corner with throttle fully closed, with needle jet type carb which draws fuel into combustion chamber to the point where spark plugs could get almost flooded vs. MJN such effect is very minimum due to again using straight hollowed tubes. This effect would make your transient accelerating throttle work much smoother.
    MJN was launched in 1992, but its development dates back to somewhere around 1988, when we were racing the oil-cooled machines. The race carbs on the oil-cooled GSX-R750's were becoming bigger and bigger, from the original 36 mm to 40 mm, to get more power. Sure, it worked and we got more power out of the engine, but its transient response, throttle response and fuel consumption got worse. Big carbs have downsides ---- that's just what they are. Anyone who have experience with big carbs would know what I'm talking about. It just doesn't quite respond to the initial twist of the throttle as crisp and snappy as the stock carb. So I thought about a solution, and suddenly came up with this idea of placing fuel jets at the center of the carb throat.”


    It was the idea of using a tube with rows of holes ---- later to be known as a Multiple Jet Nozzle (MJN) ---- instead of a jet needle. This novel method allows the fuel to be ejected from the most optimal position in the carb throat. Before the MJN, there were already several carburetors in the market that had been designed to pull the fuel further up the needle (like the Lectron with a grooved needle), but while they deliver good full-throttle performance, they have drawbacks such as poor transient response and the difficulty of adjustment due to the eccentric design of their fuel control mechanisms.


    “The very first prototype we tried only had 4 holes, one for every quarter throttle, on just one side. I think all of the holes had the same diameter, but it didn't matter. I just wanted to try. The prototype tube was handmade on a lathe. As soon as we fired up the engine, and even with the improvised prototype, we could tell the difference. The engine sounded quite different as well. I knew I hit the jackpot. We then asked Doug Polen (Dual Champion in 1989 All Japan TT-F1 & TT-F3, who was in the Yoshimura team then) to test it. But that's just the beginning.”
    “With a MJN, you can use a smaller main jet than normal because of the better atomization ---- which leads to better fuel efficiency and mileage. The transient response will be better also. It will definitely run smoother and will provide better throttle response at upper-throttle range. There's really no negatives to it.”


    As you ride a bike (any bike) equipped with MJN, you'll notice the difference in smoothness. MJN also makes the carburetor adjustment a breeze. If you are working on a 4-cylinder bike, you basically need 2 MJN's for Mikuni TMR (one for large body and another for small body) in addition to some jets and screws. Every MJN kit is custom engineered for a specific motorcycle application.


    “We had found out through our experiments that one MJN can cover a wide range of carburetor sizes and engine types. Probably because it delivers an optimal amount of fuel according to the vacuum pressure created by the engine. Adjusting a conventional carb on the other hand, requires considerable jetting skill ---- you need to select the proper taper type, straight section diameter and so on. There are so many jet needle profiles to choose from, and it takes time to find the right jet needle and needle setting, especially during races, in which you have to re-adjust the jetting at your pit area. So, the simplicity of the setting is a great advantage in winning races. It's an advantage for street riders, too ---- such simplicity of jetting and screw adjustments would allow them to enjoy setting up the carburetor.”
    there is a Chinese version i are tempted to just buy to have a look at.
    Quote Originally Posted by Katman View Post
    I reminder distinctly .




    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

  14. #4094
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    So long as the air intake for the idle system is above the fuel level, it's irrelevant where it is.
    The old GP for instance has it on the side - with a little slide to vary the air taken in. Very useful too.

    The stinger carbs are to all intents VM's with vertical throat and horizontal float chamber.
    Very like the YD carb but slightly more compact - the float chamber actually goes around the sides of the throat slightly.

  15. #4095
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    I think i understand you i was thinking you were saying the yoshi was drawing its air for the pilit circuit from the engine side of the slide.
    but you were meaning just the angle of the pick up for the jet.
    Quote Originally Posted by Katman View Post
    I reminder distinctly .




    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

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