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Thread: The Bucket Foundry

  1. #3751
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flettner View Post
    because the size of the supercharger it will run a lot slower than the engine, probably won't be anywhere near.10000 rpm. Alcohol is a good intercooler and there will be plenty of it, Teflon TIP seals won't be a problem (if needed at all).
    super charger drive pully has a shock absorbing element internal.
    All good. The F3 engine blower was 750cc displacement 3 lobe roots type - without tip seals. Straight meth into the blower via a twin choke Dellorto.
    Initially it delivered 18lb boost - but it got so hot it picked up on the ends of the rotors. By the time we'd trimmed the rotors to where it didn't pick up, we'd dropped to 15lb boost. Interesting to watch the stages when you fired it. Initially there'd be ice form on the plenum (2mm alloy then 16G steel after we'd burst that...) then as it warmed through the ice would melt and the blower would get too hot to touch.

    Seriously, you don't need a 6 speed box. The F3 bike torque spread was such that you simply kept changing up. I seriously looked at turning it into a 3 speed as the rider was complaining about how many gearchanges he had to do unnecessarily. Example - coming out of the old Ruapuna hairpin unblown was 2nd gear and up one for the esses a short distance away. Blown it didn't matter if you were in 2nd or 4th you still got to the esses too fast - but if you'd done the hairpin in 4th you could stay in that gear and ride the torque curve.
    Reason is a tool - remember where you left it..... The late, great, John Clarke

  2. #3752
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    the gearbox is a wide ratio five speed but what I most want is the large dia clutch (geared down from the crank more than the MX engine) so as to have no clutch slip problems, it may produce 45Hp according to loose preliminary calculations, if not, more Fuel/nitro until it does.

  3. #3753
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flettner View Post
    the gearbox is a wide ratio five speed but what I most want is the large dia clutch (geared down from the crank more than the MX engine) so as to have no clutch slip problems, it may produce 45Hp according to loose preliminary calculations, if not, more Fuel/nitro until it does.
    More is always better...Speedpro and I don't have that problem with the clutch. The 400 is the same clutch but wider for more plates. Same primary gear but again a tad wider. If he has a problem with his clutch he can upgrade to one which is proven to handle up to 80 HP.
    Reason is a tool - remember where you left it..... The late, great, John Clarke

  4. #3754
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grumph View Post
    More is always better...Speedpro and I don't have that problem with the clutch. The 400 is the same clutch but wider for more plates. Same primary gear but again a tad wider. If he has a problem with his clutch he can upgrade to one which is proven to handle up to 80 HP.
    The VT clutch is similar size huge reduction and lots of plates the Gearbox and Clutch used on most of the VT's is the same as the MXV and CBR250. Which is why I suggested it that along with that's its very unlikely one could have got worn out before the engine went bang.


    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

  5. #3755
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flettner View Post
    Unfortunately I found a photo of my old supercharged Honda 100, .............. 360 degree twin cylinder, half an FZR Yamaha head, miniature lobe supercharger, MX 250 clutch and gearbox, methanol, nitro and 1 atmosphere pressure.
    28mm stroke, 18 / 20000 RPM. Bugger the rules, when I built my first one the rules were 100cc fourstroke 'open'.
    ..........
    Good to see that you are totally open minded about it all! - We do all love two strokes of course but everything needs to be considered and accepted for what it can or can't do.

    Unfortunately the two stroke is having to fight for it's survival and things just look a tad dicey at the moment! as far as automotive stuff is concerned Achetes and KTM seem to be the only takers!
    The big problem (as in the case of the Wankel) is fuel consumption, pollution (perceived because of the visible smoke) and of course, my hobby horse - the massive exhaust chambers!

    Soon there will be no road going two strokes for the bucket boys to use and the only stuff left will be the small scooter engines and expensive four strokes - I reckon supercharging for them is the only logical way to go! - but someone needs to do something quick - in either case!

    Karts, skidoos and motocross, possibly aircraft, and even boats (ironically, that is where the rot began) could possibly reverse things for the two stroke and hopefully keep them going for a while longer. However that will be no good for Buckets - unless the rules can be changed??

    I understand fully now why all the old guys got pissed off after WW2 when diesels took over from steam - didn't do a helluva lot of good being pissed off though!

    So I expect we'll see some four stroke castings appearing on this thread soon??
    Freedom of speech is important but if what we say is considered incorrect by our peers, they will quickly put us right.
    P.C. will eventually destroy our right to tell the truth.

  6. #3756
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    as it happens Will, I've got a pair of twostroke case patterns that will work perfectly. Just a few add ons to change it to what I want, able to support a three bearing shell crank and provision for an oil pump. Don't worry, I hate myself for working with camshaft again but this project must be done.

  7. #3757
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    Sounds interesting anyway and I agree about cams, but we still haven't found a perfect alternative for them... yet! - I worry that while we are digging around looking for one, the whole bloody lot will be completely obliterated by electricity!
    But keep on keeping on!
    Freedom of speech is important but if what we say is considered incorrect by our peers, they will quickly put us right.
    P.C. will eventually destroy our right to tell the truth.

  8. #3758
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    Who cares, electricity can take over all it wants, just not in my workshop. If electric trail bikes take over and it's all you are allowed to use, I'll give up trail riding.
    Certainly for mass transport electric will have to be the future. I'm installing a plug at the end of the car garage now in readiness for the the wife's next car. But not for my bikes or gyro!

  9. #3759
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    I'd be real happy just to be able to ride any bike at all, whatever it's power comes from!
    Freedom of speech is important but if what we say is considered incorrect by our peers, they will quickly put us right.
    P.C. will eventually destroy our right to tell the truth.

  10. #3760
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flettner View Post
    Who cares, electricity can take over all it wants, just not in my workshop. If electric trail bikes take over and it's all you are allowed to use, I'll give up trail riding.
    Certainly for mass transport electric will have to be the future. I'm installing a plug at the end of the car garage now in readiness for the the wife's next car. But not for my bikes or gyro!
    Electricity is not a good solution for flight as the battery stay the same weight no mater what the charge, where as a fuel load gets lighter the further it flys thus extending its range.


    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

  11. #3761
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    Quote Originally Posted by husaberg View Post
    Electricity is not a good solution for flight as the battery stay the same weight no mater what the charge, where as a fuel load gets lighter the further it flys thus extending its range.
    It's quieter and doesnt require earmuffs, its cheaper to run, doesn't blow head gaskets, ice up, or seize on descent, it doesn't shake the plane to pieces at low revs on the ground (as some flat fours do) or make life difficult by refusing to start and in the event of a crash it won't turn into an instant fireball.
    Freedom of speech is important but if what we say is considered incorrect by our peers, they will quickly put us right.
    P.C. will eventually destroy our right to tell the truth.

  12. #3762
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    Foundry stuff. Today, cos it was raining and cool (20 C)(eat your heart out you kiwis ) did a run of pistons, but split the pour with a run of our aluminium kart brake discs. At 200 mm, they weigh around 400 gm compared to the 1 kg of a conventional CI ventilated disc, both being 2 mm thick. We use the same high (18%) silicone alloy that we use for the pistons.

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    To cast these, we spin the die, pouring down the centre and feeding from the inside. If not spun, the die cavity would not fill.
    However, in the spinning, the centrifugal pressure of the aluminium would try to force open the die. This is resisted by bobweights that provide a clamping force to prevent the top half of the die from lifting and hence leaking.

    Irrespective, the whole thing is spun within a stainless barrel with a drop down lid; if the lid isn’t down the rotation is interlocked out. Safety stuff really. The type of the actual barrel can be easily recognised, but as we probably helped emptying it, we felt it would be ok to use it.

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    There are ejection pins in both the top and bottom die halves. To grip the top of the die, a neat “desmodromic?” mechanism was devised to actuate grippers for the top die to initiate initial movement.

    After the casting, there is a trimming op, then a solution heat treatment and then a 3 stage machining sequence.

    Sorry the pics are on the piss, but it just does that.

    Not even made in China.
    "Perfection is the enemy of progress"

  13. #3763
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken seeber View Post
    ...aluminium kart brake discs. At 200 mm, they weigh around 400 gm compared to the 1 kg of a conventional CI ventilated disc, both being 2 mm thick. We use the same high (18%) silicone alloy that we use for the pistons.

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    Is 2 mm the total thickness between the brake pads, Ken? Are these discs coated? Do they require a special type of brake pad lining?

  14. #3764
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    Quote Originally Posted by husaberg View Post
    Electricity is not a good solution for flight as the battery stay the same weight no mater what the charge, where as a fuel load gets lighter the further it flys thus extending its range.
    You are aware that I built a gearbox for an electric helicopter?
    I laughed at them (the company Tier1) when they rang me about the project. Told them I thought they were wasting their time. I figured they would be lucky to get 10 minutes out of it, they said they had calculated fifteen.
    So I went ahead and built them a reduction drive to gear down their two electric motors. This electric R44 holds the world record for electric helicopter flight at something like 25 minutes or so I believe. Can only carry one skinny pilot and as you say Glenn, all up weight is the same at the start of flight as at the end. Never the less a great effort by them. I wouldn't fly it, probably couldn't, too heavy. So a wee way to go yet and that is using the efficiency of a full size rotor, not the silly little propellers that these virtual people carrying drones we see proposed on the internet.
    https://youtu.be/-05wY41ht1s

  15. #3765
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frits Overmars View Post
    Is 2 mm the total thickness between the brake pads, Ken? Are these discs coated? Do they require a special type of brake pad lining?
    Good spotting Frits. I made a ONE mistake, it should read 12 mm, not 2.
    Nope, not coated. Some use "soft pads" that appear to have less metal in them, but others just run regular pads. Seem to survive though.
    Importantly though, they look trick...
    "Perfection is the enemy of progress"

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