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Thread: Triumph Thruxton

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllanB View Post
    Nah - I'm with Graham - never been a fan of the fake carbs - everyone knows they are fake.

    It's like packing a full kg of salami down your trousers before going to the night club. Fake.
    Its like having rubber bands driving your cams when real ones have bevel gears....
    DeMyer's Laws - an argument that consists primarily of rambling quotes isn't worth bothering with.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Navy Boy View Post
    There we go.
    Quite stunning. That's my all favourite colour for anything and everything

    I just taken delivery of a MY18 Tiger Sport. It's Chalk'n'Cheese different to my 2008 MKI Tiger, but you only get to choose from 2 colours, and that's it
    “PHEW.....JUST MADE IT............................. UP"

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voltaire View Post
    Its like having rubber bands driving your cams when real ones have bevel gears....
    Not at all - the rubber bands actually do something and work unlike fake carbs.

  4. #19
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    I think the Amal styled throttle bodies look waaaaaaaay better than a standard one.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    American internet tire kickers were more worried about the wheels having tube type rims.
    DeMyer's Laws - an argument that consists primarily of rambling quotes isn't worth bothering with.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voltaire View Post
    I think the Amal styled throttle bodies look waaaaaaaay better than a standard one.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Different strokes and all - I think that image looks friggen cool - like the Triumph has been hot-rodded.

    And if memory serves from by boyhood reading of English mags the Amals were crappy anyway.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllanB View Post
    Amals were crappy anyway.
    As far as I know, the Amal monoblocs were exactly that, a solid block of crappy diecast aluminium muck that by sheer virtue of it's porosity, acted like a carburettor. Sadly the crankcases were often made from the same mysterious substance.
    Only a Rat can win a Rat Race!

  7. #22
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    I have a brand new set of Amal Premiers on my Commando, very well made.

    But back on topic, I really like the Thruxton, alas I don't buy new bikes so will have to wait a few years.
    DeMyer's Laws - an argument that consists primarily of rambling quotes isn't worth bothering with.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laava View Post
    As far as I know, the Amal monoblocs were exactly that, a solid block of crappy diecast aluminium muck that by sheer virtue of it's porosity, acted like a carburettor. Sadly the crankcases were often made from the same mysterious substance.
    Monoblocs were good, the later concentrics were made of pot metal and wore out very fast.
    it's not a bad thing till you throw a KLR into the mix.
    those cheap ass bitches can do anything with ductape.
    (PostalDave on ADVrider)

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamA View Post
    Lovely looking bike. A pity about the false carbs though.
    I grew up in the era of the original Thruxtons and will cheerfully admit to bias, but some bikes just look "right"

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Navy Boy View Post
    Hi All

    I've just taken delivery of my Thruxton 1200 and managed to put some 150Kms onto it last night. Initial thoughts are broken down as follows:

    Engine

    Ruddy lovely. In deference to the running in instructions I didn't venture above 4k Rpm but the motor's a real step forward from the air cooled 865 Thruxton I owned 8-9 years ago. Smooth too and it sounds good, even with the standard pipes fitted. Nice pop and burble on the overrun too which I like. A lot.

    Ergonomics

    Unsurprisingly very similar to my previous Thruxton. Almost sports tourer in where it places you and leaned forward but not extremely so. It's better for open road riding as opposed to round town type activity but doesn't feel uncomfortable for me. I'm 6'00". The only negative is that the rear of the fuel tank, where the cut outs are for your legs, is too narrow. This makes it a little awkward to grip the tank with your knees. Triumph could have made the tank a litre bigger and given you a bit more to hold on to. It's only 14 litres after all.

    Chassis

    Mine's the standard model so has the normal way-up forks and preload-only adjustable rear shocks. I'm quite happy with this and the ride seems to be a good balance between firmness and reasonable ride comfort. The brakes, whilst being normal two piston calipers, seem to be fine to me. I also found out that the ABS works too...

    Looks

    As always this is subjective. However I think it's pretty close to being perfect. A small Dart flyscreen (On its way) will help too.

    Other stuff

    IMHO the standard bike isn't $5.5k worse than the R model. I also like the colour of mine (Mettalic emerald Green or BRG with a modern twist depending on your viewpoint). The modes and TC are welcome additions but once I've set them I suspect that I'll leave them alone. Incidentally I bought the bike from New Plymouth Motorcycle Centre who were good to deal with and only too happy to help.

    Does anyone else have a Thruxton on here? What do 'ya reckon to it?

    So - An update as I'm now up to 4000Kms and I've just visited the Robert Taylor and his team at Kiwi Suspension Solutions up in New Plymouth for some Ohlins rear shocks and new fork springs.

    Chassis

    The rear end feels more composed now with less secondary reaction to bumps as and when they are encountered. The ride is still fairly stiff but there's no bounce and the new shocks have better rebound damping. Having said that the standard items were quite good and the mods I've made are as much for the bling factor as for making the bike loads more capable.

    The forks were pretty decent as standard. KSS fitted some slightly heavier springs and then reduced the preload a little to compensate. The result is good though I'd be lying if I said that I could feel a huge difference from before. In all the bike now tracks nicely and is good fun in the twists. Plus KSS set the rider and static sag for you with you sat on the bike so you know the settings are right for you.

    Engine

    I've left the motor totally standard, including the exhaust system as it sounds spot on with the standard system. As well as having plenty of mid range get-up-and-go the bike's quite happy pottering around, short-shifting at lower Rpm if you're in the mood. Having carried out a full-power trial I've discovered that it'll pull max revs in 6th gear giving you some 210-220 Km/hr with a touch more to go. At this speed the bike was pulling just over 7k Rpm so bang on the redline (I suspect the limiter cuts in around 7100-7200Rpm). More than fast enough for me and I like the fact that 6th is short enough to be really useable. If you want you can perform overtakes as low as 80km/hr in 6th and still get decent punch which makes open road riding, especially down here on the South Island, a lot more relaxing. Oh and I've managed 22Km/litre on a number of occasions too, and that's without trying too hard. It makes the 14 litre tank not too restrictive in terms of range and the fuel gauge is the most accurate I've ever seen on a bike. Even if it does have that Triumph characteristic of taking a minute or two's worth of riding to register as full after you've been to the petrol station.

    Rest of the bike

    It's chuffing brilliant! I love it. It's like my previous 2008-model 865cc Thruxton but more. More power, more chassis ability and more sound (From the standard exhaust at least). If you enjoyed the previous model Bonnevilles then you'll really like this.

    Last edited by Navy Boy; 14th October 2018 at 06:05. Reason: Spooling errors
    Navy Boy

  11. #26
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    Such an awesome looking bike, love the green.

  12. #27
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    I wish they had made them slimmer looking.

    Good to see you are enjoying yours - 4k on the clock - how's that rear tyre looking.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllanB View Post
    I wish they had made them slimmer looking.

    Good to see you are enjoying yours - 4k on the clock - how's that rear tyre looking.
    Another good thing about the standard Thruxton versus the R version is that it comes equipped with Pirelli Angel GT hoops (Their Sports touring tyre) rather than the Super Rosso Corsa ones on the R. These last longer and as such mine are looking good at the 4k mark.

    This always makes me think of when I've been to the Ron Haslam Race School in years gone by (My last trip there was in 2015). All their bikes were fitted with Bridgestone's latest Sports Touring tyres (The T30 had not long been on the market at the time) as they reckoned that they gripped well enough for anything normal punters like me could throw at them going around Donnington Park and last longer than the sportier items. They were right and ever since then I've tried to fit Sports Touring tyres where I can.
    Navy Boy

  14. #29
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    I can't believe that's what the price difference is between the Standard and the R.. In the UK it's only around £1,200!

    Nice bike though, probably one of my fave Trumpies
    2001 Ducati 996S || 2008 Yamaha CygnusX
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  15. #30
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    22nd November 2015 - 17:43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Navy Boy View Post
    So - An update as I'm now up to 4000Kms and I've just visited the Robert Taylor and his team at Kiwi Suspension Solutions up in New Plymouth for some Ohlins rear shocks and new fork springs.

    Chassis

    The rear end feels more composed now with less secondary reaction to bumps as and when they are encountered. The ride is still fairly stiff but there's no bounce and the new shocks have better rebound damping. Having said that the standard items were quite good and the mods I've made are as much for the bling factor as for making the bike loads more capable.

    The forks were pretty decent as standard. KSS fitted some slightly heavier springs and then reduced the preload a little to compensate. The result is good though I'd be lying if I said that I could feel a huge difference from before. In all the bike now tracks nicely and is good fun in the twists. Plus KSS set the rider and static sag for you with you sat on the bike so you know the settings are right for you.

    Engine

    I've left the motor totally standard, including the exhaust system as it sounds spot on with the standard system. As well as having plenty of mid range get-up-and-go the bike's quite happy pottering around, short-shifting at lower Rpm if you're in the mood. Having carried out a full-power trial I've discovered that it'll pull max revs in 6th gear giving you some 210-220 Km/hr with a touch more to go. At this speed the bike was pulling just over 7k Rpm so bang on the redline (I suspect the limiter cuts in around 7100-7200Rpm). More than fast enough for me and I like the fact that 6th is short enough to be really useable. If you want you can perform overtakes as low as 80km/hr in 6th and still get decent punch which makes open road riding, especially down here on the South Island, a lot more relaxing. Oh and I've managed 22Km/litre on a number of occasions too, and that's without trying too hard. It makes the 14 litre tank not too restrictive in terms of range and the fuel gauge is the most accurate I've ever seen on a bike. Even if it does have that Triumph characteristic of taking a minute or two's worth of riding to register as full after you've been to the petrol station.

    Rest of the bike

    It's chuffing brilliant! I love it. It's like my previous 2008-model 865cc Thruxton but more. More power, more chassis ability and more sound (From the standard exhaust at least). If you enjoyed the previous model Bonnevilles then you'll really like this.

    Done about 6k on mine since June 2017 and have similar experience to you. The tank is stupidly narrow, made worse by the width of the side covers which I have covered in clear film as my boots were scratching them.

    I fitted Bitubos to the rear - improved the compliance at the back and adds a bit of bling! The Kayabas were too stiff for me - I am a lightweight and I had only 14mm of rider sag. I am going to try some lighter weight fork oil as a budget 'tune' for the front - cant afford much else and it seems pretty right anyway.

    The 1200 engine has to be the nicest motor I have ever experienced - masses of torque everywhere yet happy to rev when asked. The Standard model seems to have the best gearing for it too.

    Click image for larger version. 

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