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Thread: Chains how to rivet a chain without getting a tight link.

  1. #1
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    Chains how to rivet a chain without getting a tight link.

    Several bikes I have owned have tight links in the chain that can caused the drive to feel lumpy at slow speeds, also it difficult to check the chain tightness, it can be either too tight or loose, depending on where the tight link is.

    Anyone that has riveted links and ended up with a chain that is as flexible on the rivetted link as the rest of them.
    Please let me know the secret. The shops do not always get it right also.

    I have thought of shaping a spacer to fit in the inside of the link to match the exact dimension of the fitted links so that it cannot press any closer
    on the links than it should.

    What would you recommend as a rivetting tool.

    Interested to hear from those that know.

  2. #2
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    A big hammer - and years of practise. I also would like to know the correct way please.....
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    I don't believe it's a good idea to try to peen the end of a chain pin like the factory does. I've done it many times in an industrial setting with different types of chain, but with a bike chain it's unlikely you'll hit the pin exactly hard enough to distort it juuust enough to retain the link without pinching the whole lot up. And with standard transmission chain the fact is you usually don't have to.

    There's any number of tools to split the chain, most do a good enough job not to damage the pin much on the way out, the trick is to press the two pins a bit at a time, so the pins and link aren't under any bending stress.

    On reassembly it's been my practice for years to simply push the link with the pins still attached back into place and carefully press the outer link back on over the original pin ends and then leave them alone. This, after reading some industry literature suggesting that this was recognised as best practice for most types of transmission chain.

    You can use a reassembly tool, or you can arrange a dolly behind the chain and using a pin punch and hammer lightly tap the front link back into place. You can usually feel them snap into place over the original pin end deformation and leave the joint completely indistinguishable from the rest of the chain. I have never had a failure from that procedure.

    If you're dead set on trying to re-form the pin then I can tell you that the correct tool is a hardened punch with a V cut into the face, used twice at 90degrees, producing the 4 wee flats you see on the end of the pin. Practice lots. Good luck.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocketman1 View Post

    I have thought of shaping a spacer to fit in the inside of the link to match the exact dimension of the fitted links so that it cannot press any closer
    on the links than it should.

    What would you recommend as a rivetting tool
    Most of the top brand chains do actually come with small gauge wire half clips that hold the o-ring/x-rings in place for the exact purpose of reducing the chance of over compression

    I've got a Stahl Wille chain breaker tool with a selection of tips for various gauge links and one conical tip for splaying the rivet tips. Fit the link, line everything up 3/4 turn on the tool then release and remove the half clip and all's done
    One adjustment done on the zx12 in 8 thousand kms, no tight spots & still within recommended deflection range

  5. #5
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    buy one of these http://www.colemans-suzuki.co.nz/pro...d_riveter.aspx the are expensive but its the last chain breaker/riveter you will ever buy and you cant over crimp the joiner As I am no longer fixing motorcycles I have a used one of these cluttering up my tool kit that you could have for $100.00 PM me if you are interested.

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    My understanding is that the side plate sits on a shoulder, leaving the gap for the o/x ring. The roller is captivated in the inner part of the chain. It's not possible to install the side plate 'too tight'. It simply bottoms out, clamped in place by the riveting tool. Then you tighten the peiner in to spread the pin head. Done quite a few now and the chain is basically continuous, no tight links. That's is using a proper tool mind you. I don't do the hammer method.
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  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=Ocean1;1131074694]I don't believe it's a good idea to try to peen the end of a chain pin like the factory does. I've done it many times in an industrial setting with different types of chain, but with a bike chain it's unlikely you'll hit the pin exactly hard enough to distort it juuust enough to retain the link without pinching the whole lot up. And with standard transmission chain the fact is you usually don't have to.

    Thanks for your detailed explanation.

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=manxkiwi;1131074791]My understanding is that the side plate sits on a shoulder,

    This may be correct but I think it you still able to peen the rivet too tight, causing the tight link.
    Once it is too tight it is very difficult to loosen. I guess the secret is to not overtighten the rivets, take it in small tightening steps.

    I have read the tension on a chain is one dimensional and the force of a rivet pulling out , even with the smallest amount of peening is very minimal.
    I have always incorrectly thought there is a huge force pulling on a rivet is huge but the force is on the side plates and is not that high, maybe ~80ft/lbs max. not that much, dependant on the bike weight and torque.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grumph View Post
    A big hammer - and years of practise. I also would like to know the correct way please.....
    Same way he does it

    I do use a proper tool from time to time though
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  10. #10
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    Proper tool makes it easy and forms the soft rivet properly. And you always have it.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by F5 Dave View Post
    Proper tool makes it easy and forms the soft rivet properly. And you always have it.
    Ah, we're coming from different schools - a lot of my experience is at race meetings shortening - or adding to - a chain to adjust gearing....Without a soft link within miles...
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  12. #12
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    My racing was 415 with finger applied links
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    Quote Originally Posted by spanner spinner View Post
    buy one of these http://www.colemans-suzuki.co.nz/pro...d_riveter.aspx the are expensive but its the last chain breaker/riveter you will ever buy
    I'd be wanting to know if it has the latest pin with the groove. I got caught out with old stock and the pin won't handle the latest DID chains.
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  14. #14
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    tight link in chain

    Decided to take bike into Boyd Motorcycles and let the professionals do it.
    Took them half and hour to fit a new one, perfect, not expensive at all, 1/2 the price of a chain breaker tool.

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