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Thread: Brake declaration: What to do/mesure/record

  1. #1
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    Brake declaration: What to do/mesure/record

    Hi there. I am re-registering a small bike. I've got the official 'repair certificate' and the next step is to go an get it re-VINned. I understand that it is a tougher WOF process and they also attach a new VIN plate (why?).
    Several documents are required by the re-VINning people and one is the 'motorcycle brake declaration'. Has anybody filled one out? I believe that anybody 'competent' can do it and I know how to drive a digital set of verniers.
    1) Do you have to take brake pads out to measure them or can I measure them in place??
    2) How accurate does one have to measure the 'ovality/runout' of the discs and drums?
    3) Where do I get the OEM brake part specs from? Is there a data base that you guys know of??

    Any suggestions appreciated!
    Joe

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe View Post
    Hi there. I am re-registering a small bike. I've got the official 'repair certificate' and the next step is to go an get it re-VINned. I understand that it is a tougher WOF process and they also attach a new VIN plate (why?).
    Several documents are required by the re-VINning people and one is the 'motorcycle brake declaration'. Has anybody filled one out? I believe that anybody 'competent' can do it and I know how to drive a digital set of verniers.
    1) Do you have to take brake pads out to measure them or can I measure them in place??
    2) How accurate does one have to measure the 'ovality/runout' of the discs and drums?
    3) Where do I get the OEM brake part specs from? Is there a data base that you guys know of??

    Any suggestions appreciated!
    Joe
    having a measuring tool does not make you competent, they're brakes for christs sake take it to someone whose actually competent to do brakes

  3. #3
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    Oh, I must have said it the wrong way. As a tradesman and mechanical engineer I do understand the importance of getting the brakes right!

    I am trying to find out if they need to be taken apart to be measured/evaluated or not. If not then I doubt that any 'bike mechanic' can measure more accurately than me. When it comes to refitting or reassembling brakes I can see a mechanic if that makes you a little bit more relaxed about it. I certainly wont let my only son ride a bike that is not safe...
    Can you enlighten me on this issue regarding the 'brake declaration'???????

  4. #4
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    umm, if your an engineer and you care about your son why wouldn't you strip the whole brake system apart and give it a service anyway? Brake fluid can crystalize when sitting, it's not hard to dissasemble the whole lot, clean the components, and reassemble, generally the seals would not needing replacing as there's really no way grit can get in and damage them, except maybe if the lower pistons are rusty or the protective boot is split.
    the only cost is a bit of fluid, and that's worth it for the peice of mind.
    what bike is it?, the brake pads will have a brand name on them, your can get on the internaughty and find the new specs, and some discs have min thickness on them, although i'm sure you can google this too, are they solid discs or har rivetted on, or are they floating discs?, check the run out and if you think it's an issue post the measurements here and ask questions.
    how long has the bike been sitting too?

  5. #5
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    Brake pads should be visible in the calipers on the bike - they usually have a wear indicator cut line - once it is gone they are toast.

    The brake disk often has a minimum thickness stamped on it.

    The brake lines will be inspected and if any damage or even old original ones they will want them replaced.


    From the people I have spoken to who have build stuff needing VIN's compliance the people involved are happy to talk to you in advance to assist.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllanB View Post
    Brake pads should be visible in the calipers on the bike - they usually have a wear indicator cut line - once it is gone they are toast.

    .
    remember they are warrantying the bike for six months to a year depending on age, close to the wear mark is not goo enough, that's why one has the specs for the brake pad with them, shows the warrant people that they are competent as well

  7. #7
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    Here is the wording from the VIRM


    Alternate method for motorcycle brake inspections
    In cases where a vehicle inspector is not familiar with the disassembly or reassembly of the motorcycle’s braking system, a relevant person or company, recognised by the entry certifier as being reputable and competent to carry out this work, may be employed to strip, inspect and reassemble motorcycle brake systems in accordance with the above inspection specifications.

    This recognised person or company must supply the entry certifier with documentation confirming that the brake system and components are within safe tolerance of their state when manufactured.

    If the motorcycle is required to comply with an approved brake standard, the documentation must also confirm that the brakes still comply with the original equipment brake standard to which the motorcycle was manufactured.

    The recognised person or company must issue a declaration confirming that:

    1. the motorcycle brake system has been dismantled, and

    2. all brake components have been inspected, and

    3. measurements have been taken and recorded, and

    4. the brake system has been reassembled with no repairs required

    OR

    any component(s) not within safe tolerance of the manufacturer’s specifications is repaired or replaced, and the brake system has been reassembled.

    If the motorcycle brake components are dismantled away from the inspection site, the brake component measurements must be recorded by the recognised person or company, or the vehicle inspector must be present during the dismantling process to record details.

    The motorcycle owner/importer may take the vehicle to the recognised person or company.


    https://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt....ing13-for-tab2

  8. #8
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    I got my bike inspected on 3 months ago after I brought it home with me from overseas. I measured the brakes and filled out the brake declaration form, all done at home. The inspector bloke at VTNZ looked the bike over, asked me a few general questions, and sent me on my way with a rego and warrant. Never said a word about the form, never rode the bike, never asked me to perform a brake test in front of him.

    If you get an inspector who knows what they are doing ( at the risk of stereo typing, a Kiwi will know what he's he's doing, you're much more likely to have trouble with an import ), they will look at the state you are in, look at the state you present the bike in, and go from there. So the lesson is, have all your' paperwork in order, be clean and tidy and dressed suitably, have the bike clean and tidy and everything working, and that'll go a very long way to making things easy. I've always worked by this theory, and I've lost count of the number of times I've been given a pass and told to "take care of xxx before we see you next time". I always do take care of it, and the next time they know that ( my car and bike are quite distinctive and they recognise it each time ) and everyone wins, especially you. It pays to "shop around" before hand the outfits where you will take the bike for the inspection to see what make and model the inspectors are........

    Anyone can do it the bike brake declaration, and I certainly wouldn't be paying for some peanut at the bike shop to do it, more likely to get it back fucked up somehow. As previously mentioned, minimum disc thickness is usually stamped around the outside edge of the disc, and minimum pad thickness should be in the workshop manual, otherwise measure the pad where the slot is in the middle as the minimum, and then the whole pad as the thickness. Easy peasy. The form doesn't ask for dealership / bike shop name, the person filling out the forms' qualifications or registered number etc, as long as someone ( anyone ) has done it, if the shit hits the fan later they can say "Joe Bloggs has signed here saying he measured it so nothing to do with us". It's all an arse covering exercise, so do it yourself and save $$ and potential hassles.

  9. #9
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe View Post
    Hi there. I am re-registering a small bike. I've got the official 'repair certificate' and the next step is to go an get it re-VINned. I understand that it is a tougher WOF process and they also attach a new VIN plate (why?).
    Several documents are required by the re-VINning people and one is the 'motorcycle brake declaration'. Has anybody filled one out? I believe that anybody 'competent' can do it and I know how to drive a digital set of verniers.
    1) Do you have to take brake pads out to measure them or can I measure them in place??
    2) How accurate does one have to measure the 'ovality/runout' of the discs and drums?
    3) Where do I get the OEM brake part specs from? Is there a data base that you guys know of??

    Any suggestions appreciated!
    Joe
    Bit feed up with seeing this Non sence i been told you dont have to worry . just take the bike in they do the rest . i have yet to do this so

    I cant say 100% maybe its the person that i spoke to either way just try it . then if you need to get whats needed then.

    You paying 185.00 let them have the hassle . cars 415.00 by the way. and much more involved . bikes are a piece of piss.

    Bike looks all there brakes work . looks right done. u cant tell me for 185.00 they get out a frame jig bs ;-)

    I mean a wof is enough the rest is bs . i put my badly crashed Vfr 750 back on the road. with a wof. only diffrence between that

    And know is the rego lasped same bike everthing .i nkow this bike better than if it was a new one as i worked on everthing myself.

    If am dumb enough to ride it not 100 % then more fool me i think strong self pressvation is enough incentive.

    World so pc know. rest is just revenue collection . just my opinion .

    If they so worried be a ban on re selling broken bikes.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jellywrestler View Post
    having a measuring tool does not make you competent, they're brakes for christs sake take it to someone whose actually competent to do brakes
    been told by the guy working at the re vining place Just the old bikes with drum brakes i assume 60,s and assume he doesint mean.

    rear drums on quite a few small new bikes .

    The car ones way more involved i saw them going over a jap import . all the linings interior removed , floor carpet. door cards.

    Was told my Old mums Nissen they check spot welds and repairs if any they have to be spot on i assume rust too.

    Only concern i have is the windscreen seal and possible rust around that . so i have to put money asside for that fix. panell beater.

    so i think Bikes are bloody easy incomparrsion . if was my sons i be going over real well. before even got to be tested .

    And when i sell some of these bikes ditto . no way letting someone on a bike and anything happen because my work.

    In saying that as long you do the job once recheck ride the bike u can feel what its like brakes etc even the chain ;-) u hear if its not right.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by actungbaby View Post
    been told by the guy working at the re vining place Just the old bikes with drum brakes i assume 60,s and assume he doesint mean.

    rear drums on quite a few small new bikes .

    The car ones way more involved i saw them going over a jap import . all the linings interior removed , floor carpet. door cards.
    yeah well i think you're only allowed to import newer cars these days, unless by special permit for classics, so would suggest you're confused byt the age of the vehicle, newer ones require a comprehensive check, pre 89 or thereabouts are deemed to be not used as much and the revinning process is a lot less stringent, done a couple and it was a breeze, although the tester could see i'd gone over it with a fine toothed comb

  12. #12
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    Thumbs up Brake declaration - no problem!

    I re-VINed a little Kawasaki 250 today. I had to supply all sorts of documents including the dreaded 'brake declaration' form. It turned out to be a non event....
    I stated that I replaced the brake pads with new ones and attached a copy of the receipt. I also bled the brake system(s). Then I signed the form.
    The guy was really friendly and helpful, not always what I experienced in the past.

    Anybody in the Bay of Plenty going through the same process give the AA Inspection Centre at 108 3rd Avenue in Tauranga a call. I can only recommend them!!!
    Cheers
    Joe

  13. #13
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    I had a similar experience at VTNZ Manukau, when I re-vinned my ST1100 which had been off the road for 10 years. They were happy with just a visual inspection of the exterior of the brakes, they did check the thickness of the discs (very close to new I think), and could see that I had replaced all pads and fluid and that everything was very clean.

  14. #14
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    I've done a few of these. I did one just 2 days ago. Get the standard form filled out and signed. Some Compliance shops will ask you to get a garage stamp on the form. The going rate is $60. Some compliance garages will test the brakes and then just fill the form out for you. Again, $60 is the going rate.

    If they are being too fussy, take it elsewhere.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jellywrestler View Post
    yeah well i think you're only allowed to import newer cars these days, unless by special permit for classics, so would suggest you're confused byt the age of the vehicle, newer ones require a comprehensive check, pre 89 or thereabouts are deemed to be not used as much and the revinning process is a lot less stringent, done a couple and it was a breeze, although the tester could see i'd gone over it with a fine toothed comb
    thanks man my mums is a 92 or 91 . damm its a solid car . looks real nice as
    its a Metalic green with full body kit . and big bore. just as she liked it.
    been in the garage all the time when not driven but she did drive it alot.
    Was serviced ever year and checked over had a few engine mounts replaced. think its the stiff suspesion . freind said being a imported jap model . the jap roads are concrete slab and smooth.
    For me its worth it . i had alot young guys stop and want to offer to buy it.
    Asked if it had a s 20 engine it does . the suspesion like concrete . apprently primias are know for that . but way better than my lowered mx5 i owned .
    Yeah i going clean the engine bay i done the sterring boot. just got fix one driving light . its been bumped back on one corner.
    I got just man up and not be chicken shit its going fail. we dont have a working car . and thats not ideal. with a fmaily .bikes dont cut it. as neither my wife she scared of bikes or my son is too young , 7 years old.
    had a fmaily emergency other night brought home how naff this is.
    had no way getting my wife to her mums .as i chouldint leave my son on his own. wife cant go on the bike so be walk there . not far. if battery was working i whould just taken chance and driven 2 km . but asked neibours insteed and they where cool about it ,drove her there. i wizzed around on the vfr . to help her she had fallen over . i actually beat the ambulance ;-). they said we saw you going pretty quick . last thing u need is a two for one call out ;-) was wet road. am like nah was just taking it easy well i thought i was .

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