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Thread: Requesting DIY vacuum brake bleeder or assistance

  1. #1
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    31st August 2017 - 22:59
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    Requesting DIY vacuum brake bleeder or assistance

    Heya,

    Had a go with the search box and couldn't find any similar posts. Basically when I had the handlebars upside down for replacing the mount on my near new mt07 from a low speed lowside, I pumped the brakes ... rookie mistake. A fair amount of pressure returned and they work okay, still plenty better than my old bike and faster to stop than cars but really really squishy at times.

    I've read that I'm better of using a vacuum bleeder for lots of air bubbles since they will work their way up as I go through the fluid, and I want to get them back to 100%, all the ones in nz are well above a hundred dollars which I'd prefer not to spend, basically I'm just hoping someone can give me any ideas on making one myself since it just needs to pull a vacuum on it, or if they have one I can borrow in Auckland for some form of reimbursement that would be even better!

    Formatting probably sucks big time on this since I wrote on my phone, sorry in advance and thanks in advance for any help!

  2. #2
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    28th May 2006 - 19:35
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    Quote Originally Posted by harleydaun View Post
    Heya,

    Had a go with the search box and couldn't find any similar posts. Basically when I had the handlebars upside down for replacing the mount on my near new mt07 from a low speed lowside, I pumped the brakes ... rookie mistake. A fair amount of pressure returned and they work okay, still plenty better than my old bike and faster to stop than cars but really really squishy at times.

    I've read that I'm better of using a vacuum bleeder for lots of air bubbles since they will work their way up as I go through the fluid, and I want to get them back to 100%, all the ones in nz are well above a hundred dollars which I'd prefer not to spend, basically I'm just hoping someone can give me any ideas on making one myself since it just needs to pull a vacuum on it, or if they have one I can borrow in Auckland for some form of reimbursement that would be even better!

    Formatting probably sucks big time on this since I wrote on my phone, sorry in advance and thanks in advance for any help!
    from whaat you've described if there's air in the system it will be only in the top, i'd be taking the calipers off and pushing the brake pads back a bit, with all four pushed back a little then this should push any bubbles through back into the master cylinder.
    re pump the brakes till tight and you're done.
    remember it's brakes though, is it worth your life to have a go or pay someone proper?

  3. #3
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    14th July 2006 - 21:39
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    Try strapping the brake leave 'on' over night - a strong rubber band around the throttle and brake or a piece of electrical wire tied up works. If you are lucky the air will rise. Works for slight sponginess.

    Or old fashion fluid change and bleed - a speed bleeder makes this easier https://www.bits4bikes.co.nz/View-A-Product/ID/25106

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllanB View Post
    Try strapping the brake leave 'on' over night - a strong rubber band around the throttle and brake or a piece of electrical wire tied up works. If you are lucky the air will rise. Works for slight sponginess.
    so how does that get rid of a bubble at the banjo then, that's where it usually stops? great words for brake repairs too, 'if you're lucky'....

  5. #5
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    28th September 2017 - 18:48
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    Quote Originally Posted by jellywrestler View Post
    so how does that get rid of a bubble at the banjo then, that's where it usually stops? great words for brake repairs too, 'if you're lucky'....
    Upping the pressure will dissolve more air into the brake fluid, which then undissolves across the whole line when the pressure is released, some of which will then make it's way back to the master.

    Can be a cunt of a job as it requires a few goes sometimes, but it's not like its going to catastrophically/unexpectedly fail/change while riding.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jellywrestler View Post
    from whaat you've described if there's air in the system it will be only in the top, i'd be taking the calipers off and pushing the brake pads back a bit, with all four pushed back a little then this should push any bubbles through back into the master cylinder.
    re pump the brakes till tight and you're done.
    remember it's brakes though, is it worth your life to have a go or pay someone proper?
    Yeah I recon ill just go pay someone to get it done, who do you guys recon is the most trustworthy in Auckland to do a good job?

  7. #7
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    Simple job for any shop - take you pick of ones close to home/work.



    For future reference when doing anything that involves a job where you don't want to accidentally pull the brake lever (front wheel off etc) masking tape a piece of wood or similar between the lever and throttle grip - I've found a $2 cork sanding block from Bunnings or similar perfect for the job.

  8. #8
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    You could always get the mechanic to come to you - George the Motorcycle Doctor...

  9. #9
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    28th January 2015 - 16:17
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    A quick thing to try is take the brake master cylinder off the handlebar and angle it so that the master piston (and banjo) are now vertical, ie lever hinge end down, outside end up.

    Any air trapped in the top banjo can be cleared by lightly working the lever, while everything is still vertical - the air will come out of the little hole to the reservoir placed at the piston's end of travel. You'll feel it pretty quickly if it's working and this takes about ten-ish minutes.

    Please excuse if I'm stating the obvious - make absolutely sure the reservoir lid is on, and tight, before doing this. I've caught myself nearly doing this with the lid still off after bleeding work, I very nearly dumped a master's worth of brake fluid all over the tank and dash. If in any doubt, throw an old towel over the bodywork (usually a good idea with brake work anyway).

  10. #10
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    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AfWAzw2CEN.../lotionfun.jpg
    He takes a syringe full of fluid and a length of hose then push the air in the direction it wants to go ie up to the master cylinder.
    It never fails
    Thats why Husaberg and KTM include them in their kits.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    http://www.motoxparts.co.nz/p/brake-...tool-nac-tools
    $11ffs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=lBk00597EyE



    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

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