Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18

Thread: Conti Road Attack 3

  1. #1
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    235

    Conti Road Attack 3

    Has anyone tried these yet? They are getting great reviews but no one seems to buy Continental motorbike tyres.

    I might try a set on the R1 as I'd like to get more than 6,000 km from a rear.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    3rd October 2006 - 21:21
    Bike
    Breaking rocks
    Location
    in the hot sun
    Posts
    3,273
    I have just scrubbed in a pair on my monster, they seem pretty good but I am no Rossi...
    Only a Rat can win a Rat Race!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    20th June 2011 - 20:27
    Bike
    BMW XChallenge, GSXR1250fa, Tuono 1100
    Location
    Glen Eden
    Posts
    9,497
    Ran contis once. Quickest i have ever flat spotted a rear. PR5 is the tyre you want. Sporty profile as well.

    Sent from my M5 Note using Tapatalk
    Quote Originally Posted by Katman View Post
    but once again you proved me wrong.
    Quote Originally Posted by cassina View Post
    I was hit by one such driver while remaining in the view of their mirror.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    21st December 2017 - 11:43
    Bike
    2000 Ducati 996S MY01
    Location
    Hobart, Tasmania
    Posts
    339
    I had a set of Conti Sport Attack 2's on my R6 back in 2010-ish. They were really great, felt good, lasted longer than the Michelin Power 3's I've got on the 996. I rate Continental as a tyre manufacturer but it's hard to find people who get them in over here and not many places are keen on fitting tyres they didn't sell you (even if you take the wheels in).

    Like Metzeller, they are often unfairly overlooked (here, at least)
    2001 Ducati 996S || 2008 Yamaha CygnusX
    Four wheels move the body; Two wheels move the soul

  5. #5
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    235
    Quote Originally Posted by WALRUS View Post
    I had a set of Conti Sport Attack 2's on my R6 back in 2010-ish. They were really great, felt good, lasted longer than the Michelin Power 3's I've got on the 996. I rate Continental as a tyre manufacturer but it's hard to find people who get them in over here and not many places are keen on fitting tyres they didn't sell you (even if you take the wheels in).

    Like Metzeller, they are often unfairly overlooked (here, at least)
    There is a NZ distributor for Contis so anyone should be able to order a set. Moto1 in Auckland sell them.

    I've used the Metzeler M7RR for the last 2 years. Brilliant tyres but it gets expensive replacing the rear every 6-7,000 km.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    9th May 2008 - 21:23
    Bike
    A little yellow one
    Location
    Northern Waikato
    Posts
    2,278
    Quote Originally Posted by SaferRides View Post
    There is a NZ distributor for Contis so anyone should be able to order a set. Moto1 in Auckland sell them.

    I've used the Metzeler M7RR for the last 2 years. Brilliant tyres but it gets expensive replacing the rear every 6-7,000 km.
    For most road riding, using a sport/touring tyre will give you the mileage, without sacrificing much in the way of ultimate grip. Like Spokes already commented, Michelin Road 5, is one good example. Metzeler M7RR is a sweet tyre, and yes I've run a set.

    Or go old school and run sport up front and sport/touring rear, such as Bridgestone S21 up front and T31 on rear.

    By the way, Michelin Pilot Power 3 responds about the same as Metzeler M7RR but at 2/3 the price with longer wear. First hand experience.

    Often overlooked is state of suspension, correct spring rates and damping, never mind last time oil was changed in forks or shock Properly sorted suspension works wonders
    If the words I say offend you, imagine the ones I keep to myself...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    14th July 2006 - 21:39
    Bike
    2015, Ducati Streetfighter
    Location
    Christchurch
    Posts
    8,541
    Blog Entries
    8
    I ran a set of Conti RA2's on my previous bike. More sport than touring, and the rear did flat spot quickly compared to other tyres I had run. Stuck like glue.

    Conti did a push in NZ years back when the Attack series were launched. Good pricing etc. The other big brands pushed back. Tough, small market. Good tyres though.

    I ran the T30 after the RA2 on that same bike - best tyre I had on it, traded it before they died so can not atest to wear but they were looking good.


    Try the Conti if you get a decent price.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    235
    Thanks for the comments everyone.

    I am concerned about how the RA3 rear will wear. The M7RR has quite a narrow band of harder centre compound, so you're onto the grippy stuff almost as soon as you lean it. This also prevents the dreaded flat spot from developing.

    Continental vary the curing temperature so that the compound is progressively softer towards the shoulders. The earlier RA tyres did seem to flat spot easily, but it seems the RA3 is much better.

    I'd like to try a set, but the M7RR is just such a good tyre on the R1.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    8th January 2005 - 15:05
    Bike
    Triumph Speed Triple
    Location
    New Plymouth
    Posts
    8,173
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by caspernz View Post

    Or go old school and run sport up front and sport/touring rear, such as Bridgestone S21 up front and T31 on rear.
    That is a thing, and yes I've done it, but I wouldn't do it again. The manufacturers often put their best wet weather technology into their sport touring tyres. That could mean that in the wet, and unbeknown to the rider, the back tyre is stickier than the front. That could lead to a nasty surprise.

    Michelin were making their sport and sport touring tyres in different profiles and no, there was nothing about that on the side of the tyre.

    Some rear tyres don't have much water draining ability. The manufacturer is relying on the design of the front tyre to clear the water from the road surface. If you fit a different design front you are potentially creating another problem.

    So I'm a fan of matched tyres but having said that I'm soon to change brands because the brand I've been using has no agent here. For a while I'll be running a mismatched pair. Unless I win Lotto.
    There is a grey blur, and a green blur. I try to stay on the grey one. - Joey Dunlop

  10. #10
    Join Date
    14th July 2006 - 21:39
    Bike
    2015, Ducati Streetfighter
    Location
    Christchurch
    Posts
    8,541
    Blog Entries
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by pritch View Post

    So I'm a fan of matched tyres but having said that I'm soon to change brands because the brand I've been using has no agent here.
    I blame the Government - what can't you get anymore?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    235
    Quote Originally Posted by pritch View Post
    That is a thing, and yes I've done it, but I wouldn't do it again. The manufacturers often put their best wet weather technology into their sport touring tyres. That could mean that in the wet, and unbeknown to the rider, the back tyre is stickier than the front. That could lead to a nasty surprise.

    Michelin were making their sport and sport touring tyres in different profiles and no, there was nothing about that on the side of the tyre.

    Some rear tyres don't have much water draining ability. The manufacturer is relying on the design of the front tyre to clear the water from the road surface. If you fit a different design front you are potentially creating another problem.

    So I'm a fan of matched tyres but having said that I'm soon to change brands because the brand I've been using has no agent here. For a while I'll be running a mismatched pair. Unless I win Lotto.
    Mixed tyres can be fine when both are new, but in my experience the problems start when they wear. I ran a SportSmart front with a RoadSmart rear for a while, which felt fine when they were new. Not so good as the rear wore, and started losing grip compared with the front.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    8th January 2005 - 15:05
    Bike
    Triumph Speed Triple
    Location
    New Plymouth
    Posts
    8,173
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by AllanB View Post
    I blame the Government - what can't you get anymore?
    Dunlop Roadsmart. I can get them, but none of the local dealers stock them so they cost much more than Metzeler, Michelin or Pirelli, which they do stock.

    I used to run Metzeler so I’ll work my way back to them.
    There is a grey blur, and a green blur. I try to stay on the grey one. - Joey Dunlop

  13. #13
    Join Date
    17th June 2010 - 16:44
    Bike
    bandit
    Location
    Bay of Plenty
    Posts
    2,786
    Quote Originally Posted by SaferRides View Post
    Thanks for the comments everyone.

    I am concerned about how the RA3 rear will wear. The M7RR has quite a narrow band of harder centre compound, so you're onto the grippy stuff almost as soon as you lean it. This also prevents the dreaded flat spot from developing.

    Continental vary the curing temperature so that the compound is progressively softer towards the shoulders. The earlier RA tyres did seem to flat spot easily, but it seems the RA3 is much better.

    I'd like to try a set, but the M7RR is just such a good tyre on the R1.
    I've run Road Attacks on my 650 Bandit for years - awesome tyre - better than the Bridgestones, PRs and Pirellis I have run ..

    You are right to be concerned about the wear - I killed my first Road Attack in 3,001 ks - yes you read that right. I went to Road Attacks because Continental said I'd get 8,000ks out of a Road Attack, after learning I killed the PRs and Pirrellis in 5,000ks .. they were wrong - but they are such great tyres I still use them. The cost is worth the fun ..

    I don't run them on my 1250 Bandit - I ride that a bit different and the RAs made the bike turn a bit faster than I liked .. I run PRs on that ..


    Different tyres suit different bikes and riding styles - the best thing is to try them and see how you like them and if they last ..
    "So if you meet me, have some sympathy, have some courtesy, have some taste ..."

  14. #14
    Join Date
    17th June 2010 - 16:44
    Bike
    bandit
    Location
    Bay of Plenty
    Posts
    2,786
    Quote Originally Posted by caspernz View Post
    Or go old school and run sport up front and sport/touring rear, such as Bridgestone S21 up front and T31 on rear.
    I ran a grippy sports tyre on the front and a sports/tourer on the rear on my big Bandit - a couple of times the rear let go while the front was still gripping - I don't do that any more - matching tyres on both bikes ..
    "So if you meet me, have some sympathy, have some courtesy, have some taste ..."

  15. #15
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    235
    I spoke to AJ at Motohaus the other day. The feedback he's getting is the RA3 doesn't wear, so looks like the rapid wear issues are in the past.

    The rear now has a puncture so time to decide. Looks like a trip to the Burt is on in February next year, so maybe the RA3 will be the way to go.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •