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Thread: looking for advise on next step in my licence

  1. #1
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    27th May 2018 - 10:39
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    looking for advise on next step in my licence

    Hi all just wanting to know what is the best way to progress with my licence is ? I have my learner and have been riding for about 8 months on my gn250 (I use to ride when I was young) and was on a moped for 2 years until my ass got to big and the thing would not move me very fast..lol should I do the vtnz restricted or the CBTA one? are they much different? is one better for me then the other?? your help would be very useful thank you in advance

  2. #2
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    28th May 2006 - 19:35
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    you mustn't be a millnenial, they'd be saying which one is easier to pass!

  3. #3
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    4th June 2013 - 17:33
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    good question, another good question would be why are the two systems allowed to co-exist?

    I got my restricted before CBTA was an option. I had two very different experiences.

    If you go down the VTNZ route you will be followed by a testing officer in a car, they will give you instructions via a radio you can listen to. It will take 30 minutes and arguably you will be able to bluff your way through and not have all the requisite skills of motorcycling assessed. The testing officer will not necessarily be a motorcyclist and therefore not necessarily know the difference between a rider who is legal and a good one. You will have a pass or fail notice at the end of it.

    CBTA, longer, more involved, WILL make you demonstrate a fuller range of motorcycling skills and they will be assessed by a motorcycle instructor. Regardless of outcome you will have feedback on what worked well and what you need to work on/think about to become a better rider. You will not be able to bluff your way through this one.

    I guess the option you choose depends on your priorities, do you want the licence to have meaning or do you want the legal framework to ride without an L plate?
    I hope you choose the former and the CBTA route. Good luck!
    Life is not measured by how many breaths you take, but how many times you have your breath taken away

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jellywrestler View Post
    you mustn't be a millnenial, they'd be saying which one is easier to pass!
    Nah only a millennial would use "advise" instead of advice.

  5. #5
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    18th January 2015 - 19:09
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    I would say CBTA.

    I ended up doing the VTNZ test for my restricted, and CBTA for my full. I found both very easy, and i guess this would vary depending on where you are, and traffic etc.

    didn't have to go over 70 - 80km/hr for either, and there wasn't much traffic etc.

    I did feel like if you didn't fall off or do anything illegal, you would pass the VTNZ test. but the CBTA, while i thought it was far too easy, it did put a greater emphasis on actually paying attention to side roads etc, and noticing what was going on around you. which is far more use than just following the road rules.

  6. #6
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    i'm not a millennial just a shit speller........

  7. #7
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    go the CBTA route / class route, they're fun and the testing is more enjoyable than having to wait for a dork in a car to keep up

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scubbo View Post
    go the CBTA route / class route, they're fun and the testing is more enjoyable than having to wait for a dork in a car to keep up
    that too, you get to deal with someone who also rides, and will probably be willing to talk about bikes and stuff. and generally they have chosen that line of work to try and pass on some knowledge and help people ride safer.

    whichever way you go, I am still of the opinion that a fair proportion of the whole thing is an "attitude test", so if you dress appropriately, and don't be a knob-end, then that's half the battle won.

  9. #9
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    Either is fine. If you haven't spent much time with a motorcycle instructor, you'll want to do the CBTA training before doing the test. Some instructors are part of the Ride Forever scheme and offer coaching classes subsidised by ACC so check those out before you pay for private training.

  10. #10
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    CBTA teaches riding structure. Ride Forever covers that structure.

    Kind of depends on whether you are interested in learning good habits, or just giving a box.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rastuscat View Post
    CBTA teaches riding structure. Ride Forever covers that structure.

    Kind of depends on whether you are interested in learning good habits, or just giving a box.
    and while giving it, he can tick it?
    Life is not measured by how many breaths you take, but how many times you have your breath taken away

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rastuscat View Post
    CBTA teaches riding structure. Ride Forever covers that structure.

    Kind of depends on whether you are interested in learning good habits, or just giving a box.
    depends who you get I suppose.

    I hadn't done the Ride Forever courses by then, the CBTA test itself didn't seem any more difficult than an VTNZ test would have been. The guy told me what sort of things he would be looking for, and i did them.

    one thing i did find interesting, was that he said that if there was safe opportunity, I would be expected to lane-split, and that would be marked against "making progress". this was something i hadn't done much of, since in Hamilton drivers are twats and will often block you.
    Luckily mid-morning traffic didn't exist so we just rode around Rotorua and that was it.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by neil. View Post
    depends who you get I suppose.

    I hadn't done the Ride Forever courses by then, the CBTA test itself didn't seem any more difficult than an VTNZ test would have been. The guy told me what sort of things he would be looking for, and i did them.

    one thing i did find interesting, was that he said that if there was safe opportunity, I would be expected to lane-split, and that would be marked against "making progress". this was something i hadn't done much of, since in Hamilton drivers are twats and will often block you.
    Luckily mid-morning traffic didn't exist so we just rode around Rotorua and that was it.
    He said he'd mark you down for NOT lane splitting if the opportunity was presented? As opposed to sitting in lane and waiting like the rest of traffic?

    tell that dude to get fucked, IMO lane splitting involves trusting the general public not to be a retard WAY too much, fuck putting your life in other peoples hands...

    I don't care if you DO lane split, what i'm saying is that you shouldn't be marked down for not doing it.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Sichoe View Post
    He said he'd mark you down for NOT lane splitting if the opportunity was presented? As opposed to sitting in lane and waiting like the rest of traffic?

    tell that dude to get fucked, IMO lane splitting involves trusting the general public not to be a retard WAY too much, fuck putting your life in other peoples hands...

    I don't care if you DO lane split, what i'm saying is that you shouldn't be marked down for not doing it.
    From memory it is nebulously worded as "making progress through traffic" or something similar to that. Probably means not fuckin about if you don't need to be.

  15. #15
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    With sufficient training, practice and experience under your belt, the test itself should be just a formality. The trick to acing all sorts of tests and exams is in the prep (homework) and (as someone wisely said) attitude.

    Having 'the right gear' is not just about safety on the test but demonstrating your concern about the risk of broken ankles, head trauma, hand trauma, gravel rash and more. It shows commitment to being seen and riding safely. It's nothing to do with expensive brands or shining your helmet. Turning up for the test in teeshirt, shorts, no gloves and jandals is just asking for trouble, and disrespectful.

    Also a no-no, by the way, is rolling up on an obviously non-roadworthy/shagged out bike with dodgy tyres, no L-plate, broken lights ...

    It helps to know what the pass/fail criteria or expectations are going to be, and that's the kind of stuff you should pick up from the trainer and perhaps pals who have passed - including many right here on KiwiBiker (not me: mine was a LONG time ago in Saaaarf London. And for the record I failed my first carpark test because I had no idea I was not supposed to put a foot down while doing the low speed maneuvers around the cones. Never even occurred to me, and a dead giveaway that I was self-taught!]

    I'll second the idea of Ride Forever and also recommend "Motorcycle Roadcraft" as a book or eBook. Sound advice in there, if a bit much for a beginner unless you are keen to learn - and it sounds like you are. It's well worth re-reading from time to time after you pass ... and about time I did exactly that.

    Aside from that, it's hard to beat on-road experience (if you're licensed) - ideally a variety of routes and situations, ideally with an experienced rider tagging along, offering advice and encouragement. Confidence + skills + the caution that comes with hazard awareness = competence + fun.

    Good luck!

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