Advertise with Kiwi Biker
Page 4 of 17 FirstFirst ... 2345614 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 243

Thread: Four dead and two hurt today

  1. #46
    Join Date
    7th September 2009 - 09:47
    Bike
    Yo momma
    Location
    Podunk USA
    Posts
    4,408
    Quote Originally Posted by sidecar bob View Post
    "lifestyle bikers"
    Like this faggot.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9zNUPDmnz4

  2. #47
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    524
    Quote Originally Posted by Flip View Post
    I have become a bit afraid of riding in anything but perfect conditions, with people I trust. I guess I have buried a few biker frends but more have dies of drugs or cancer. I have got to the stage where I look at any unknown rider and wonder if their perception of road hazards/risks is the same as mine.

    At easter we took vintage military bikes down to Wanaka from Gisborne and had a brillant trip, didnt have any problems other than breakdowns, my interests these days is certanly towards vintage bikes because of the risks riding at high speed. Who would have thought that after 40 years on two wheels I would finally become wary of motorcycling.

    How many folk here have taken up the ride forever cources?
    I did a Silver course a couple of months ago when they were free. Definitely worthwhile, it has improved my riding skills.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    3rd May 2016 - 17:36
    Bike
    Ninja 300
    Location
    Cheech
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by SaferRides View Post
    Thanks. It is the total for each age though, not the rate per km or number of riders, plus the age bands are different.

    I have graphed it and adjusted the age range to 10-year bands by adding the 20-24 and 25-29 numbers. Assuming that 40+ is 40-65, the total for this age band was divided by 2.5. The 15-19 group was left out as the numbers are small.

    There doesn't seem to be any trend, just year to year variations. I might do the injuries later if I get bored.

    Good to put it as a graphic,
    Just for interest sake, why would you divide the 40+ by 2.5?

    This graph here also eludes to the same generation of motorcyclists being the top statistic.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Capture.JPG 
Views:	42 
Size:	44.0 KB 
ID:	339607  

  4. #49
    Join Date
    13th July 2008 - 20:48
    Bike
    K1600GTL
    Location
    Rangiora
    Posts
    3,943
    Quote Originally Posted by jasonu View Post
    New bike, new tyres. The power of silicon is amazing.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    7th December 2007 - 12:09
    Bike
    Valkyrie 1500 ,HD softail, BMW r1150r
    Location
    New Plymouth
    Posts
    2,145
    Quote Originally Posted by Flip View Post
    I

    How many folk here have taken up the ride forever cources?
    Done gold a wee while back when it was free.
    Highly recommended.

    And re grouprides.... Only if I know who I'm riding with.
    The minute I see alcohol being consumed at a a stop I'm out of there.
    Opinions are like arseholes: Everybody has got one, but that doesn't mean you got to air it in public all the time....

  6. #51
    Join Date
    28th October 2012 - 13:59
    Bike
    KTM 1290 SDGT
    Location
    thata way
    Posts
    546
    Quote Originally Posted by KezzaCFC View Post
    This help?
    the boomers hold the majority of motorcyle licences and do the majority of road miles as you will see by the graph as
    we moved from our teens to 40+

    If you have mates that only ride 6 months of the year, get them out for a spin early, get in front and set a relaxed
    pace on some not to challenging roads and let them settle back into the groove, plenty of stops and not a huge
    day. Mates look after mates
    Political Correctness, the chief weapon of whiney arse bastards

  7. #52
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    524
    Quote Originally Posted by KezzaCFC View Post
    Good to put it as a graphic,
    Just for interest sake, why would you divide the 40+ by 2.5?
    The 40+ age band is much wider than 10 years, so assuming it is 25 years (40-65), I divided by 2.5 to make to equivalent to a 10-year band.

    The graph you posted is of the same data, so the first 3 age bands are 5 years, 30-39 is 10 and 40+ is more than 25.

    So the graph shows 40+ as being much higher when it isn't.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    1st November 2005 - 08:18
    Bike
    F-117.
    Location
    Banana Republic of NZ
    Posts
    6,960
    Quote Originally Posted by SaferRides View Post
    4 in a weekend isn't good, but it doesn't reflect the long term trend.
    It is common with this time of the year though. Almost set-your-clock-to-it regular.
    Quote Originally Posted by sidecar bob View Post
    It would be a shame if "lifestyle bikers" made it more difficult for "lifetime bikers"...
    That would screw up half of Sturgis then.
    TOP QUESTION: Is it called the 'Holy' Bible because the story in it is so full of holes?

  9. #54
    Join Date
    4th June 2013 - 17:33
    Bike
    R1200GSA
    Location
    Kapiti
    Posts
    1,003
    I did a ride forever course yesterday. 6 riders with anything from 5 to 30 years experience. All have done advanced riding training. Me aside I would consider them all very competent riders. Every single one of us was taken outside our comfort zone. Every single one of us learned something new and came away with a renewed desire to ride better and arguably live longer! Confidence was higher because we had tried things in a controlled environment, with opportunities to get it wrong, analyse, remediate and try again. We were all equipped with additional tools to handle things when the shit hits the fan. At the start of the day not everyone was convinced of the value of being there. At the end of the day we all wanted to do it again and bring our riding friends. It was one day, one solitary day. Imagine how good we could get if we did two or three of these things a year and actually practiced stuff in between?
    Look there will always be situations where it all goes wrong. There will always be tragedy, Injury and sadly, loss of life on our roads. That said, would you not consider it smart to do something that gives you an improved chance of avoiding strife or, if it finds you anyway, getting out of it?
    Nobody sets out to crash, pretty sure the poor sods who died at the weekend didn’t. We do control our choices however and like the ACC ad says our next one could be a life saving one. Would you not prefer to be better equipped to make those choices?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Life is not measured by how many breaths you take, but how many times you have your breath taken away

  10. #55
    Join Date
    1st November 2005 - 19:06
    Bike
    Honda,Black,Shadow 750
    Location
    Levin
    Posts
    214

    Not Realy

    Quote Originally Posted by KezzaCFC View Post
    This help?
    Check the age groups They start at 3year gaps and end on an open end. I know of a rider 89 and still riding regularly. So the age gap of the over 40 is 49 years and don't think he is the oldest rider in NZ. Regards Richard
    Regards Richard
    Growing old is mandatory Growing up is purely optional
    Retired teenager

  11. #56
    Join Date
    17th November 2009 - 15:39
    Bike
    1999 VFR800
    Location
    Manukau
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by SaferRides View Post
    The 40+ age band is much wider than 10 years, so assuming it is 25 years (40-65), I divided by 2.5 to make to equivalent to a 10-year band.

    The graph you posted is of the same data, so the first 3 age bands are 5 years, 30-39 is 10 and 40+ is more than 25.

    So the graph shows 40+ as being much higher when it isn't.
    Good job demystifying the statistics. I saw the original when I did a Ride Forever course last year and swallowed the whole "older riders are dying in increasing numbers" thing without much critique.

    The actual statistic that would be more meaningful would be rider deaths per 1000 registered riders split by age class; I suspect the significant factor here is that there is a big bulge of ageing riders that make up high proportion of the riding population.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    15th October 2009 - 17:33
    Bike
    2014 Honda NC750X
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    728
    Blog Entries
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by jasonu View Post
    Is it a Harley?
    Hardly. Har har har.
    Moe: Well, I'm better than dirt. Well, most kinds of dirt. I mean not that fancy store bought dirt. That stuffs loaded with nutrients. I...I can't compete with that stuff.
    - The Simpsons

  13. #58
    Join Date
    17th June 2010 - 16:44
    Bike
    bandit
    Location
    Bay of Plenty
    Posts
    2,845
    Quote Originally Posted by jasonu View Post
    Exactly - twit. If he'd made it onto the road he might have done many stupid things - and got himself killed ,,,


    Quote Originally Posted by KezzaCFC View Post
    Good to put it as a graphic,
    Just for interest sake, why would you divide the 40+ by 2.5?

    This graph here also eludes to the same generation of motorcyclists being the top statistic.

    Yes - clearly it is the older riders - especially the new ones or the returning ones. Yes, I know the age spread is more than 10 years ..

    It's an indication that mid-life crisis can kill ...
    "So if you meet me, have some sympathy, have some courtesy, have some taste ..."

  14. #59
    Join Date
    8th June 2011 - 19:31
    Bike
    SuperScooter 2010
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by SaferRides View Post
    Thanks. It is the total for each age though, not the rate per km or number of riders, plus the age bands are different.

    I have graphed it and adjusted the age range to 10-year bands by adding the 20-24 and 25-29 numbers. Assuming that 40+ is 40-65, the total for this age band was divided by 2.5. The 15-19 group was left out as the numbers are small.

    There doesn't seem to be any trend, just year to year variations. I might do the injuries later if I get bored.


    Sorry, this is self serving nonsense. You can't just "divide by 2.5" to get a much lower number while leaving the graph label as 40+. If you want to make assumptions about where the 34 fatalities(2016) in the 40+ category sit in terms of 10 year age groups, fine, but don't just leave out more than half the deaths and then claim there's no obvious pattern. There is, older riders, are disproportionately responsible for fatal motorycycle accidents.

  15. #60
    Join Date
    3rd May 2016 - 17:36
    Bike
    Ninja 300
    Location
    Cheech
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by SaferRides View Post
    The 40+ age band is much wider than 10 years, so assuming it is 25 years (40-65), I divided by 2.5 to make to equivalent to a 10-year band.

    The graph you posted is of the same data, so the first 3 age bands are 5 years, 30-39 is 10 and 40+ is more than 25.

    So the graph shows 40+ as being much higher when it isn't.
    It is though, you can just knock 2.5 times off and still call it 40+

    Quote Originally Posted by thehovel View Post
    Check the age groups They start at 3year gaps and end on an open end. I know of a rider 89 and still riding regularly. So the age gap of the over 40 is 49 years and don't think he is the oldest rider in NZ. Regards Richard
    Quote Originally Posted by Cadbury View Post
    Good job demystifying the statistics. I saw the original when I did a Ride Forever course last year and swallowed the whole "older riders are dying in increasing numbers" thing without much critique.

    The actual statistic that would be more meaningful would be rider deaths per 1000 registered riders split by age class; I suspect the significant factor here is that there is a big bulge of ageing riders that make up high proportion of the riding population.
    Whilst the stats need a bit of work, an extra band (40-49, 50-59, etc) or a ratio, this statement which I first referred the table to still rings true.

    "the anecdotal evidence suggested it was middle-aged men who did not have the experience to handle large motorbikes who were involved in most accidents"

    Key word, 'middle aged'. Middle ages also doesn't stop at 49.
    i.e got their license in the 70's, had a family, stopped riding, kids left home, lots of money, buy litre bike without additional training, crash.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •