Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 155

Thread: older riders surviving badly

  1. #46
    Join Date
    19th March 2005 - 18:55
    Bike
    Wots I gots.
    Location
    BongoCongistan.
    Posts
    812
    Quote Originally Posted by seattle smitty View Post
    Maybe not, Berries, yet not that bad either (referring to your previous post). A good friend was a career sergeant in the Army, including leading squads in Korea and Vietnam, and a lot more time Stateside training the new meat. He once said that, instead of the semi-auto M-1s used in Korea, and the fully-automatic M-16s used in Vietnam, he wished his troopies had been issued old bolt-action rifles, his idea being that the boys could be encouraged to make more careful shots, and wouldn't have to carry, and waste, so much ammo. Yeah, the comparison is a stretch, but maybe having spent early years riding old spaghetti-framed bikes is a useful background even for riding modern sportbikes that handle so much better. I toss that in for what it's worth, Berries (i.e., not much, oh well).
    ...and remembering how the brakes were drum-rubbish and the headlights were Lucas-P.O.D-crap... it was very clear even to us adolescents it would hurt muchly to go faster than you could see and brake. In the absence of dedicated safety gear (Army surplus boots, and Line 7 parkas were about the 'best' affordable) there was a very direct link between foolishness and pain.

    Also in the Mists of Antique Time, many drivers would have had - through lack of Overseas Funds to buy cars - have come up through the cheap-bike ranks themselves, so they looked out for bikes. These days, we are a small minority riding in the lines and queues of people who never rode, never will, and are impatient and self-obsessed.

    Without ACC protecting them from expensive consequences, people on the roads don't worry overmuch about what could go wrong. Until it does.

    Gad! Having just read what I wrote, maybe I better sell the bikes and check in now to the Evening Twilight Rest Home.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    19th March 2005 - 18:55
    Bike
    Wots I gots.
    Location
    BongoCongistan.
    Posts
    812
    Quote Originally Posted by seattle smitty View Post
    Anyway, the Hurt Report. The third over-represented group was the low-visibility riders, in black leather and such, with black helmets. Wearers of high-vis clothing and helmets did not figure much in Hurt's stats. Whether this was due to the bright garb, or to the fact that guys who choose to wear this stuff are undoubtedly tuned in to any other means of self-preservation while riding, well, who could say.
    An interesting discussion on this topic on Visordown couple of years back. In brief; paradoxically, Hi-Vis wearers may be more likely to be seen as easily bullied by drivers; black-on-black riders may be more likely regarded as thugs so do not mess with them & steer clear (literally and figuratively).

    Only way to be sure is probably to dress in contrasting gear on alternating days for a month and then view a helmetcam movie taken at same times of the day on the same route...

    Hey, Shane Jones! Fund this you corruptocrat!

  3. #48
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    524
    Quote Originally Posted by RDJ View Post
    An interesting discussion on this topic on Visordown couple of years back. In brief; paradoxically, Hi-Vis wearers may be more likely to be seen as easily bullied by drivers; black-on-black riders may be more likely regarded as thugs so do not mess with them & steer clear (literally and figuratively).

    Only way to be sure is probably to dress in contrasting gear on alternating days for a month and then view a helmetcam movie taken at same times of the day on the same route...

    Hey, Shane Jones! Fund this you corruptocrat!
    Not all Hi Vis is equal either. I recently replaced my free, SaferRides Hi Vis because the zip would come undone sometimes when riding at 104 km/h. I bought a Revit vest, which meets ECE whatever and seems a couple of shades brighter than the old one.

    In the few months I've been using it, I can't recall a single incident where someone has failed to see me, even on the motorway.

    The instructor on the Ride Forever course did mention that wearing a white helmet was the one thing you could do that would most increase your chances of being seen.

  4. #49
    Join Date
    19th March 2005 - 18:55
    Bike
    Wots I gots.
    Location
    BongoCongistan.
    Posts
    812
    Quote Originally Posted by SaferRides View Post
    The instructor on the Ride Forever course did mention that wearing a white helmet was the one thing you could do that would most increase your chances of being seen.
    Interesting. Any evidence of this? if true - why do we have orange and blue for attention-getting lights for motor vehicle indicators and NZ's largest patched gang respectively...

    ... and you were doing 104km/hr and you lived! you scofflaw... and gambler :-)

  5. #50
    Join Date
    28th October 2012 - 13:59
    Bike
    KTM 1290 SDGT
    Location
    thata way
    Posts
    546
    Quote Originally Posted by Berries View Post
    Told the wife I had to downsize so went from an SV1000 to a GSXR750 a couple of years back. Engine capacity went down, power, speed, handling, grin factor and general hooliganism went up. She's happy I am on a smaller bike, I am happy because she doesn't know the rest.

    Not sure how I am going to justify going back up in capacity to her next time. Might just have to get some 500cc stickers made to cover up the numbers.
    Tell her you got it "ON SPECIAL" because it has the wrong stickers
    Political Correctness, the chief weapon of whiney arse bastards

  6. #51
    Join Date
    17th November 2009 - 15:39
    Bike
    1999 VFR800
    Location
    Manukau
    Posts
    27
    I've been lucky enough to have been riding continuously since 1982, so I survived my teenage years and have done my fair share of stupid things, often on bikes with seriously marginal brakes, tyres and frames. I'm happy to ride on modern radials with decent brakes on bikes with well-considered geometry, although none of my bikes has much more than 100bhp. I have been known to ride in a "brisk and spirited manner" and value a steady smooth rate than riding like my arse was on fire.

    I try and stack the odds in my favour wherever possible, always dress for the crash not the ride, and am anal about tyre and suspension condition, and I probably focus too much attention on road hazards like gravel and slick tar which makes me a bit slow in places where I'm uncertain.

    I do treat riding as a mental exercise, one which requires 100% concentration, and if I'm not feeling the vibe then I prefer to stay home. I've done three ride training courses, the Coca Cola riding school in 1982 to placate my Dad, and then the Ride Forever Silver and Gold courses in 2017. The latter highlighted some of my bad habits around cornering lines and certainly made me re-evaluate what I was doing, and I'm intending to repeat the courses reasonably often. It was good to hear that ACC might offer a discount for trained riders, to me that made a lot of sense.

    It might be curmudgeonly of me, but I sense that the average driver is getting more complacent, probably in line with the reduction in actual road policing that goes on. On the open road there seems to be a real trend towards lazy cornering that aims to move the steering wheel the least while only having a passing thought towards remaining in a lane or keeping left. Maybe too many other distractions in modern cars as well, from personal experience the touchscreen interface is a real problem as you try to hit a specific spot while the car is bouncing. Bring back the knobs and buttons I say!

  7. #52
    Join Date
    4th June 2013 - 17:33
    Bike
    R1200GSA
    Location
    Kapiti
    Posts
    1,003
    Quote Originally Posted by Banditbandit View Post
    I ride year round - I don't park the bikes in winter ..

    I think I'm just a lucky hoon ..
    Less luck, more you keep riding, riding is a skill, use it or lose it.



    Quote Originally Posted by Banditbandit View Post
    Yeah - I did consider that - as I dropped in behind the last bike in the snake it looked like a young woman on a harley 500 .. she freaked and wobbled - did not seem happy for me to be behind her ... So then I wasn't ..


    Yeah - chances are they did not see me before I passed them ... (the last one certainly did .. ) Yes - I've have bikes pass that I didn't even see coming ... as long as they don't hit me all good .. the only ones who rattle me are way too close .. others .. (Well, I tend to open the throttle and chase them .. but never too hard - I won't push anyone who doesn't look confident - and I won't chase competent riders on real sports bikes - I know what I can and can't do .. if they are really moving I let them go - but it's funny to watch guys on high speed sports bike who can't lose a 650 bandit ...) .. I was really wide on the corner - almost on the right side white line ..

    In the end - such things happen on the road - and they need to get used to traffic .. If they had been at 100klicks I would not have done it .. they was only doing 80ks ... (I had a thought there - but it's gone ... ) ... Oh yeah - they didn't see me coming - and I was GONE before they could react ..
    Fair enough, often the best way to deal with a hazard, whether real or potential is to get away from it. You are correct in that part of the learning process is about the unexpected or other road users acting outside the box. I guess its my inclination to be that bit more accommodating when I see L plates or groups like that which are likely under instruction.





    Quote Originally Posted by Banditbandit View Post
    I really watch the road - no letting the attention wander off .. unless I'm cruising .. I watch cars, their body language, driver's heads - anything looks even slightly suspect I back off ...

    So often I'm reacting BEFORE anything actually happens ...

    I suppose you'd call that experience ..
    I would suggest its anticipation, analysis and response. There are plenty of "experienced" riders who take in as much information as you do and watch the road really carefully. They just don't do anything with it. 30 Years riding may just mean 30 years of making the same mistakes over and over again.
    These are possibly the same riders whose mates talk about how good a rider they were after they die riding.

    Roadcraft is essentially what you are describing: watching the road is gathering information, looking for what is suspect; backing off could be one or all of position, speed and gear in response to what you anticipate happening and then; accelerate to get away (at 140klicks on a bend is probably not always the best solution there.....) rinse and repeat.

    Thank you for the honest answer. Your posts have always struck me as coming from a decent spud, glad to see I wasn't wrong.
    Life is not measured by how many breaths you take, but how many times you have your breath taken away

  8. #53
    Join Date
    4th June 2013 - 17:33
    Bike
    R1200GSA
    Location
    Kapiti
    Posts
    1,003
    Quote Originally Posted by SaferRides View Post
    Not all Hi Vis is equal either. I recently replaced my free, SaferRides Hi Vis because the zip would come undone sometimes when riding at 104 km/h. I bought a Revit vest, which meets ECE whatever and seems a couple of shades brighter than the old one.

    In the few months I've been using it, I can't recall a single incident where someone has failed to see me, even on the motorway.

    The instructor on the Ride Forever course did mention that wearing a white helmet was the one thing you could do that would most increase your chances of being seen.
    Do bear in mind those are all passive aids, not things to rely on. There are lots of positive actions you can take to ensure you can be seen and even more important, positive actions to take when you make the assumption that other road users may not see you despite all your efforts.

    I also think there is some merit in our clothing having an impact on other road users actions.

    I ride a big bike with lots of lights. I wear black gear with lots of reflective patches and flashes and a white helmet. The back of the bike has an auxillary tail and brake light. Also there is hatched reflective tape on the back of the top box. I am also the better part of 2m tall and 112kgs in my birthday suit.
    The number of drivers who slow down when they see me, pull alongside me etc is quite funny at times, there is just enough about me and the bike to make them wonder if I am a patrol bike. It could be simply confirmation bias on my part of course.

    Another decision I made was about hi viz vests. There are two hanging in my cupboard and they will likely stay there I spent a hell of a lot of money on gear that is guaranteed waterproof. Part of that is because the outer skin of the gear repels water and does not get saturated. If I were to put a hiz viz vest on it will not function like that and will get saturated in the wet. Come the hotter drier weather that same hi viz gear stops the venting system on my jacket working properly. Given how much of me is actually visible from the front and rear of the bike I have decided I am in fact safer being dry and warm or properly cooled than relying on some other muppet seeing me because I have a hi viz vest on. Instead I take positive actions to make myself seen and more importantly act as if I am not seen anyway.

    There is a guy who has a blog/website called the Science of Being Seen, he came to Shiny Side Up last year and is coming this year. Check him out, he has a lot to say about being seen and its hard to argue with much of what he says.
    Life is not measured by how many breaths you take, but how many times you have your breath taken away

  9. #54
    Join Date
    1st September 2007 - 21:01
    Bike
    1993 Yamaha FJ 1200
    Location
    Paradise
    Posts
    12,999
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by RDJ View Post
    black-on-black riders may be more likely regarded as thugs so do not mess with them & steer clear (literally and figuratively).
    Why Black gear is still very popular ... but it is hard to look menacing on a GN125 ...
    Sweat wipes off. Road-rash doesn't.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    4th June 2013 - 17:33
    Bike
    R1200GSA
    Location
    Kapiti
    Posts
    1,003
    Quote Originally Posted by FJRider View Post
    Why Black gear is still very popular ... but it is hard to look menacing on a GN125 ...
    unless you are attempting to menace the GN125
    Life is not measured by how many breaths you take, but how many times you have your breath taken away

  11. #56
    Join Date
    1st September 2007 - 21:01
    Bike
    1993 Yamaha FJ 1200
    Location
    Paradise
    Posts
    12,999
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Ulsterkiwi View Post
    unless you are attempting to menace the GN125
    Those brave enough to be riding a GN125 ... must be brave enough to handle it ...
    Sweat wipes off. Road-rash doesn't.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    30th January 2004 - 11:00
    Bike
    2017 MT-09
    Location
    In a happy place - Kapiti
    Posts
    2,117
    All the arguments in the world won't get me ever wearing hi-viz. We're motorcyclists, not cotton wool wrapped wimpets.
    Happiness is a means of travel, not a destination

  13. #58
    Join Date
    23rd February 2007 - 08:47
    Bike
    Suzuki gsxr 600k7. Hayabusa K9 DRZ250 K
    Location
    CHCH
    Posts
    1,905
    Interesting thread. As I get older my desire to ride hard is undeminished. My experience level is good. I try to remain fit because it helps. Unfortunately my eyes are painted on, so that has always been a limiting factor, that is increasing over time. I sold my sports bike to slow myself down on the open road and because I was getting uncomfortable. Still not over doing that. Fortunately I still have the Busa....The street triple I replaced it with is brilliant, if a bit soulless. A right weapon on the Akaroa hill. I find I struggle when riding my trail bike, just don't have the muscle strength I had once. I think riding as much as possible is the best help in helping us mature riders stay current. Riding courses are a good idea. I have done a few, but must do more. I might be growing older, but I am in no hurry to grow up....

  14. #59
    Join Date
    3rd February 2004 - 08:11
    Bike
    1982 Suzuki GS1100GK, 2008 KLR650
    Location
    Wallaceville, Upper hutt
    Posts
    4,265
    Quote Originally Posted by RDJ View Post
    Interesting. Any evidence of this? if true - why do we have orange and blue for attention-getting lights for motor vehicle indicators and NZ's largest patched gang respectively...

    ... and you were doing 104km/hr and you lived! you scofflaw... and gambler :-)
    My old GS1100GK suzuki, with a full barn-door fairing and me wearing a white helmet - to a barely awake driver maybe I resemble a police bike and they act accordingly. The fuck-off Fiamm horns are for those who dont.
    it's not a bad thing till you throw a KLR into the mix.
    those cheap ass bitches can do anything with ductape.
    (PostalDave on ADVrider)

  15. #60
    Join Date
    12th July 2003 - 01:10
    Bike
    Harley, Marina & a V8 or two..
    Location
    The Riviera of the South
    Posts
    13,973
    Quote Originally Posted by dangerous View Post
    yeah I get the majority thing as in 45-55 the commonest age for a rider, fuck we come from that area... but we are very experienced, myself mega mileage under my belt on the road on the track even an acredited MNZ coach... but I dont have it anymore is this common with getting to this age group? are we to blazay I bloody well hope not


    at 50 I doubt to many treat the road as a race track... or do we, like it was us that drank and drove in the day... and yes every time ya ride ya learn, think ya know it all and its all over...

    Me?
    At 65 I ride like a nana (even more than I used to!) and terrified every time I see a car approach from a side road/street or pass a vehicle parked at the side of the road in the open road areas - and very wary of those that pull left without indicating. (after nearly getting taken out by one driver that did tat who then started doing a U-turn right on front of me).

    In fact after a long spell without riding I am petrified when I start a ride and then go to 'somewhat less than petrified' for the the rest of the ride - OK, well maybe just very very aware and cautious!

    And the older I get the more wary I get.

    Probably because I've been to more motorbike crashes than the average rider?
    Winding up drongos, foil hat wearers and over sensitive KBers for over 13,000 posts...........
    " Life is not a rehearsal, it's as happy or miserable as you want to make it"

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •