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Thread: Newbie learner biker, need help transporting bike.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    24th March 2019 - 19:13
    Bike
    2018 Kawasaki Ninja 650
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    10

    Newbie learner biker, need help transporting bike.

    Hi everyone, I'm a Learner biker and a complete newb. Just bought my first new bike.

    Problem is I live on a hill, the roads near my house are too steep for me to practice as beginner, (tipped over twice when starting and stopping uphill), so I need to get my bike to a flat carpark and take it one baby step at a time, practicing on clutches and gears without having to worry about the bike rolling backwards.

    I don't really have any biker friends who can ride the bike to a carpark for me, so I've been reading online about the various ways to transport it with a car. It seems that tow dolly is a bad idea for the bike as it can wear down its hardware and back tyre (and the method looks unstable), so I'm thinking either a carrier or trailer? I found this carrier online: https://www.bestdeals.co.nz/online-5...RoC7JUQAvD_BwE

    My parents have a suv which I will need to install a towbar for towing. Though I'm not sure how that carrier is going to fit onto the towbar (since the towbars I've seen are a round knob).

    The bike is quite heavy (200kg), but I prefer to load it up by myself if there is a smart way to do it. So any advise on this is much appreciated. I've looked at videos on carriers where people would hold the bike from the side and put in first gear for the bike to move up the ramp, like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZvP...A&index=2&t=0s

    I don't know how long it will take for me to get used to the clutch and gears at a carpark before I feel comfortable on a road; but if it doesn't take long for most people (say a week), then perhaps I could also rent a trailer; as a quick browse online says a cage trailer costs about $40/day, though I'm not sure if the rental companies here also supply straps and ramps etc for loading the bike. So I might as well invest in a $300 carrier.

    Otherwise, I don't know how I can get my bike to a parking lot since there aren't any hiring services in NZ where you can pay someone to ride a bike to a designated place.

    Please offer some advise everyone, as I'm kinda stuck.

    Thank you all.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    15th February 2017 - 13:17
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    BMW G310GS
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    What bike is it? 200 kg is a decent size. Can you park it at a friend's house who live on flat part of town?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    24th March 2019 - 19:13
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    Wellington
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeeper View Post
    What bike is it? 200 kg is a decent size. Can you park it at a friend's house who live on flat part of town?
    Kawasaki Ninja 650L, I'm in Wellington. Hoping to tow it to the riverside carpark in Lower Hutt where there's a decent space to practice.

    I don't have any friends who can bike, nor anyone I know who live on a flat non-busy road. I think I'm alone on this T_T

  4. #4
    Join Date
    1st June 2014 - 21:23
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    Ducati 748R
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    nelson
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    159
    That's a big bike to learn on...! Hopefully somebody here will volunteer to help even loading a bike on a trailer can be a handful the first time especially if you are not familiar with how everything feels.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    10th February 2017 - 15:01
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    2009 Honda TransAlp
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    Hawkes Bay
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    That bike's too big! Borrow, hire or buy a little 125-350cc runabout to learn on: easier to balance, less crushing if you fall. Spend a whole day learning the basics, firstly in an empty carpark.

    Wellington is too hilly! Move somewhere flatter.

    You're too green! Take some lessons to get you started. An hour or three tuition will turn you a darker shade of green at least.

    Good luck mate!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    15th October 2009 - 17:33
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    Auckland
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    Do you have a licence? If so how did you do your Basic Handling Test, was it on this bike?

    I agree money might be better spent hiring a smaller bike so you can get some confidence going.
    Moe: Well, I'm better than dirt. Well, most kinds of dirt. I mean not that fancy store bought dirt. That stuffs loaded with nutrients. I...I can't compete with that stuff.
    - The Simpsons

  7. #7
    Join Date
    10th June 2006 - 18:35
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    KTM
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    Wellington
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    bro you just need to get moving, right?

    get a mate or your dad to help you point the nose of the bike downhill and just do loops of oriental bay -> point haswell -> airport -> round the bays and back into town via happy valley road.

    2 hours on the bike and you'll be sweet

    rinse and repeat the next day and you'll have the knack of it (or sell bike and give up )

  8. #8
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    24th March 2019 - 19:13
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    Quote Originally Posted by nerrrd View Post
    Do you have a licence? If so how did you do your Basic Handling Test, was it on this bike?

    I agree money might be better spent hiring a smaller bike so you can get some confidence going.
    I passed my BHST with a scouter, it was pretty easy since I'm used to riding scouters. But I've decided to try out a motorbike.

    The clutch and gears are very new to me, and the hilly terrain adds another layer of difficulty when you're new to gears.

    There is no flat area where I live and I have to drive past a couple 180deg u-turns that are quite steep uphill to get out of my area. I don't want to do that until I'm proficient with clutch and gears.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Sichoe View Post
    bro you just need to get moving, right?

    get a mate or your dad to help you point the nose of the bike downhill and just do loops of oriental bay -> point haswell -> airport -> round the bays and back into town via happy valley road.

    2 hours on the bike and you'll be sweet

    rinse and repeat the next day and you'll have the knack of it (or sell bike and give up )
    Lol, riding downhill sounds like a good idea; I actually did a few nose downhill at my neighbourhood and it was pretty good. Problem is going back up when you are not familiar with gears. If two hours is all it takes to get used to clutch/gears, maybe I'll just get someone from my bike service shop to take me to a carpark for a day. I just don't like bothering other people too much if there's a way I can do this myself. But yeah, I just need to get moving.

    I'm quite comfortable with this bike, it feels very stable when I'm on it. Problem is I keep stalling when I ride uphill with no experience in clutch/gears.

    Thanks for all the comments you posted so far, guys. Really appreciate it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    13th July 2008 - 20:48
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    K1600GTL
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    When hill starting, have your left foot on the ground, and your right foot on the rear brake.

    That way your right hand has only the one job to do, being control the throttle.

    If you have your right foot on the ground, you will have to use the front brake to stop the bike rolling away, at the same time as coordinating the clutch and throttle.

    Take it from someone who rides heavy bikes.

    You're welcome.

  10. #10
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    25th October 2002 - 17:30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tui View Post
    I'm quite comfortable with this bike, it feels very stable when I'm on it. Problem is I keep stalling when I ride uphill with no experience in clutch/gears.

    Thanks for all the comments you posted so far, guys. Really appreciate it.
    Are you using the rear brake to hold the bike when starting on a hill?
    http://www.kiwibiker.co.nz/forums/signaturepics/sigpic31_1.gif

  11. #11
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    24th March 2019 - 19:13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rastuscat View Post
    When hill starting, have your left foot on the ground, and your right foot on the rear brake.

    That way your right hand has only the one job to do, being control the throttle.

    If you have your right foot on the ground, you will have to use the front brake to stop the bike rolling away, at the same time as coordinating the clutch and throttle.

    Take it from someone who rides heavy bikes.

    You're welcome.
    Quote Originally Posted by onearmedbandit View Post
    Are you using the rear brake to hold the bike when starting on a hill?
    Thanks for the tip guys. Yes I did use the rear brake after realizing the front one was too awkward to work with. Still quite a handful for me at this stage though, esp. when I try to change to 2nd gear when the engine is revving too high going uphill on 1st.

    I definitely need to find myself a flat surface and get comfortable with changing gears first.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    10th February 2017 - 15:01
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    2009 Honda TransAlp
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    Hawkes Bay
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    One way of riding up and around a U bend is to put yourself in the right gear for the bend well before you get there. If that means 1st or 2nd gear, you'll be screaming along at normal speeds before the bend ... so slow down. Approach the bend slower and try to maintain a steady slow speed around the bend.

    Turn around, nip back down, and try it again. And again. And again, leaving the 'changing down to the correct gear' a bit later each time as you build confidence.

    I don't always get it right and sometimes find myself needing to change gear on an unfamiliar corner, or when something happens - not ideal but I've been riding for long enough not to worry about it ... except learning to anticipate better next time.

    Head up! Look where you're going! Think further ahead!

    Last resort, stop and do a hillstart. That's something you can easily and safely practice somewhere off the beaten track - plenty of quiet hilly side roads in Welly. Pick a gentle slope at first, then progress to the steeper ones as your confidence increases.

    By the way, downhill starts are worth practicing too. Launching at warp 10 is easy, fun even. Taking off firmly but gently due to hazards and bends ahead is not quite so easy. Maintaining balance and control at any speed is the issue.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    24th March 2019 - 19:13
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    Quote Originally Posted by GazzaH View Post
    One way of riding up and around a U bend is to put yourself in the right gear for the bend well before you get there. If that means 1st or 2nd gear, you'll be screaming along at normal speeds before the bend ... so slow down. Approach the bend slower and try to maintain a steady slow speed around the bend.

    Turn around, nip back down, and try it again. And again. And again, leaving the 'changing down to the correct gear' a bit later each time as you build confidence.

    I don't always get it right and sometimes find myself needing to change gear on an unfamiliar corner, or when something happens - not ideal but I've been riding for long enough not to worry about it ... except learning to anticipate better next time.

    Head up! Look where you're going! Think further ahead!

    Last resort, stop and do a hillstart. That's something you can easily and safely practice somewhere off the beaten track - plenty of quiet hilly side roads in Welly. Pick a gentle slope at first, then progress to the steeper ones as your confidence increases.

    By the way, downhill starts are worth practicing too. Launching at warp 10 is easy, fun even. Taking off firmly but gently due to hazards and bends ahead is not quite so easy. Maintaining balance and control at any speed is the issue.
    Cool, thanks for the tip. I'll remember this when I'm confident enough for that bend.

  14. #14
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    13th July 2008 - 20:48
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    Quote Originally Posted by onearmedbandit View Post
    Are you using the rear brake to hold the bike when starting on a hill?
    Given your skill with your right hand Bro, I thought you'd have taken the back brake off your Gixxer to save weight

  15. #15
    Join Date
    15th February 2017 - 13:17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tui View Post
    Kawasaki Ninja 650L, I'm in Wellington. Hoping to tow it to the riverside carpark in Lower Hutt where there's a decent space to practice.

    I don't have any friends who can bike, nor anyone I know who live on a flat non-busy road. I think I'm alone on this T_T
    How did you get it home? Was it delivered?

    The trick with clutch is to figure out where the biting point is. Also remember clutch is not all or nothing, you can feather it (or slip it) to get smoother control over slow speed manoeuvreing.

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