Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 41 of 41

Thread: Ryco oil filters

  1. #31
    Join Date
    27th September 2008 - 18:14
    Bike
    SWM RS 650R
    Location
    Richmond
    Posts
    3,815
    How do they know that the filter reduced oil pressure?
    Have they tested it? I doubt it.
    My guess is that they have seen a lubrication failure snd a non genuine filter and jumped to a conclusion that suits them.
    I mentioned vegetables once, but I think I got away with it...........

  2. #32
    Join Date
    20th January 2010 - 14:41
    Bike
    husaberg
    Location
    The Wild Wild West
    Posts
    9,806
    Quote Originally Posted by HenryDorsetCase View Post
    If the thing is still under warranty you might find that unless a Kawasaki filter is used that is installed by an approved factory trained technician, in the specifically factory approved hermetically sealed workshop that makes the HRC MotoGP shop look like a back yard chop shop, using only platinum and iridium plated factory Kawasaki service tools, and only after singing the Kawasaki corporate song, and doing the company approved calisthenics and the company approved 45 minutes of Zen meditation, then it ain't covered. Just saying.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLbCVTW0O0c
    https://img.ifunny.co/videos/77ca2a1...501934c8_1.mp4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9jsnAD4aNw



    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

  3. #33
    Join Date
    3rd February 2004 - 08:11
    Bike
    1982 Suzuki GS1100GK, 2008 KLR650
    Location
    Wallaceville, Upper hutt
    Posts
    4,270
    A long time ago (1972) I had a warranty claim rejected by Laurie Summers Ltd, who were the Kawasaki distributors at the time. Bike in question was an F9 Bighorn. Failure was the rotary disc valve had shredded and gone into the inlet port and from there, destroyed the piston. Bike was within warranty period, but warranty was rejected because they claimed there was sand in the carburettor cavity, even though the air filter (genuine Kawasaki!) was installed and all the rubber boots, etc were securely installed. Apparently I should have known to "apply a thin film of grease to the inside surfaces to trap any dirt", even though the owners manual stated nothing of the sort. No consumer guarantees act in those days.

    maybe the Aussie guy is just experiencing normal motorcycle warranty delivery
    it's not a bad thing till you throw a KLR into the mix.
    those cheap ass bitches can do anything with ductape.
    (PostalDave on ADVrider)

  4. #34
    Join Date
    5th January 2007 - 14:58
    Bike
    motocompo
    Location
    Buttfuck nowhere
    Posts
    4,618
    Quote Originally Posted by Katman View Post
    Just curious....

    What is your level of mechanical knowledge and aptitude?
    Logs off feeling smug & slightly superior.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    27th November 2012 - 11:25
    Bike
    '16 xtz125, '03 fireblade
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    955
    Blog Entries
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Katman View Post
    Just curious....

    What is your level of mechanical knowledge and aptitude?
    just shy of 11 inches on a good day with a nice project

  6. #36
    Join Date
    13th June 2010 - 17:47
    Bike
    Exercycle
    Location
    Out in the cold
    Posts
    4,950
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodman View Post
    How do they know that the filter reduced oil pressure?
    Have they tested it? I doubt it.
    My guess is that they have seen a lubrication failure snd a non genuine filter and jumped to a conclusion that suits them.
    Probably true.

    If you want a laugh at filtration, the Benelli 650 twin is a superb example. Rare in NZ, i've built a couple.
    Typical italian roller bearing bottom end - and typical italian filtration, a fine gauze screen in the pump pickup.
    Their US distributor convinced them to add a disposable filter element when they wanted to sell in the US.
    So they did. A bypass filter. What it does is take some of the oil pump output and run it through a filter element in the center of the engine, underneath the crank. When I worked out where it goes after that I didn't initally believe it. It simply squirts the oil exiting the filter cavity straight up against the underside of the crank. Not into any bearing or collector for distribution, straight onto a balance web.
    In this case as I've pointed out to owners, the more restrictive the filter element, the better the oil pressure in the engine as more is put into the lubrication output side of the pump.
    Reason is a tool - remember where you left it..... The late, great, John Clarke

  7. #37
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    542
    Quote Originally Posted by pete376403 View Post
    A long time ago (1972) I had a warranty claim rejected by Laurie Summers Ltd, who were the Kawasaki distributors at the time. Bike in question was an F9 Bighorn. Failure was the rotary disc valve had shredded and gone into the inlet port and from there, destroyed the piston. Bike was within warranty period, but warranty was rejected because they claimed there was sand in the carburettor cavity, even though the air filter (genuine Kawasaki!) was installed and all the rubber boots, etc were securely installed. Apparently I should have known to "apply a thin film of grease to the inside surfaces to trap any dirt", even though the owners manual stated nothing of the sort. No consumer guarantees act in those days.

    maybe the Aussie guy is just experiencing normal motorcycle warranty delivery
    Kawis did that sort of thing quite often back then. My first bike seized about halfway up the Bombay Hills after a few minutes of full throttle. They did fix it under warranty.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    542
    Quote Originally Posted by Grumph View Post
    IMO if they're blaming it on "lower oil pressure" due to a more restrictive filter then the supply to the heads is marginal anyway.
    How it works is that the relief valve will still hold the system pressure at the correct figure. If the flow volume is reduced then yes, damage can occur.
    It'd be interesting to hear what if any lower end damage has been done.

    Also be interesting to see if there's a recall or a tech bulletin about it.
    I never cease to be amazed by what you can find on line...

    A Purolator Pure 1 filter for a LS1 engine has a pressure drop of 4 psi at 40 lpm with hot oil (95?C). LS1 filters have no pressure relief valve. This rises to 7 psi at 15 lpm. Can't imagine a Ninja 400 pump flowing anything like that volume.

    Pure 1 filters would generally be considered restrictive; in fact Purolator warn against using them in motorbike engines.

    Obviously the pressure drop will be much higher with cold oil, but then the relief valve should open.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    27th September 2008 - 18:14
    Bike
    SWM RS 650R
    Location
    Richmond
    Posts
    3,815
    Quote Originally Posted by SaferRides View Post
    I never cease to be amazed by what you can find on line...

    A Purolator Pure 1 filter for a LS1 engine has a pressure drop of 4 psi at 40 lpm with hot oil (95?C). LS1 filters have no pressure relief valve. This rises to 7 psi at 15 lpm. Can't imagine a Ninja 400 pump flowing anything like that volume.

    Pure 1 filters would generally be considered restrictive; in fact Purolator warn against using them in motorbike engines.

    Obviously the pressure drop will be much higher with cold oil, but then the relief valve should open.
    To be fair ls1's are notorious for having crazy sensitive oil pressure.
    I mentioned vegetables once, but I think I got away with it...........

  10. #40
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    542
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodman View Post
    To be fair ls1's are notorious for having crazy sensitive oil pressure.
    Sorry, I missed out that the test was done on a test rig by Purolator. No engine involved.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    3rd November 2007 - 07:46
    Bike
    KTM 1290 SDR
    Location
    Palmerston North
    Posts
    3,863
    Quote Originally Posted by SaferRides View Post
    Pure 1 filters would generally be considered restrictive; in fact Purolator warn against using them in motorbike engines.
    And how many failures documented with bikes using Pure One filters? Perhaps they don't recommend them because they want to push their cheaply made (China) ML motorcycle filters?
    Nunquam Non Paratus

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •