Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: 1986 vs 2003 vs 2015

  1. #1
    Join Date
    3rd October 2006 - 21:21
    Bike
    Breaking rocks
    Location
    in the hot sun
    Posts
    3,612

    1986 vs 2003 vs 2015

    Got an extended ride on a 1986 CBX750f honda today. Was a good reminder of how much things have moved on... The guy that owns it keeps it in great nick, it is low km's original condition and he rode my 2003 Monster for the duration. First thing was how smooth it was heading off. It also felt very heavy, even tho it is only marginally heavier than my Ducati. I think it would be OK to do a reasonably long day on comfort wise but not sure if my mate will do that on this bike.
    Power was way down, less than I was expecting even when revving it out. To the point where you need to be very careful when overtaking. The gearbox was fine, if a bit clunky compared to the Monster. That is not a bad thing, it is nice sometimes to actually know it has gone into gear! My mates BMW S1000 is so light you often dont even feel it!
    The brakes are very dated, and like the motor, possibly could benefit from a bit of fine tuning/cleaning/setup. The feel was very wooden and soggy, not at all confidence inspiring. I couldn't help thinking that I have been spoilt with good brakes etc but had to remind myself that in 1986, none of the bikes I had or rode were as good as the CBX!
    I also ride a 2015 Multi and that is as far removed from the Monster as the Monster is ahead of the CBX. And not entirely in a good way either. The electronics have been troublesome and the handling can be quite quirky if one thing is not set up properly. The comfort is phenominal so it is the supreme touring bike and not out of sorts on gravel roads either. The electronics that can be so troublesome also make it an easy bike to ride fast, great traction control, active suspension and adaptable/adjustable abs etc
    It made me wonder if this improvement will continue in this way with future models, lighter, more powerful, more rider aids or is it going to just top out because of cost boundaries etc.
    I have done nearly 20,000km on the Multi and nearly 6,000km on the Monster and to be honest, I get more enjoyment from the Monster with it's zero electronic aids and no nonsense rideability.
    The current generations of non user servicable hardware is a big turnoff for me now as well. Such as catalitic convertors and mufflers that cannot be removed etc.
    I used to look forward eagerly to new models coming out, but now it is often a big disappointment. Esp when you see a racy looking prototype and then it comes on the market in six months looking like a commuter...
    maybe I will update this thread in 5 yrs time?
    Only a Rat can win a Rat Race!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    13th April 2007 - 18:26
    Bike
    95 triumph daytona;06 scrambler
    Location
    Not in town. Wooot!
    Posts
    4,113
    Blog Entries
    1
    I hear ya. Have been looking at all sorts of bikes to update to. (promised myself in the 90's to get a new bike every 10yrs).
    Nothing seems to get the nod lately. (I might be dead).
    Had a CBX750 when they came out. Advertised as the most powerful 750 ever. Till the GSXR came out

  3. #3
    Join Date
    24th November 2015 - 11:20
    Bike
    Moto Guzzi V85TT
    Location
    Blenheim and Welly
    Posts
    377
    An interesting thread this - Thanks. This is something that I've often thought about - I reckon that a lot of the engines from 80s and 90s bikes would be fantastic in today's chassis. I'm thinking 1980s Kawasaki GPZs for example.

    The nearest I get to this is riding my 1995 Triumph Thunderbird as opposed to my 2017 Triumph Thruxton 1200. Both lovely machines but the differences are fairly stark - Especially when it comes to fuel economy and handling/roadholding. I realise that the Thunderbird was never intended to be a sporty machine but the suspension and componentry are noticeably less capable. Having said that I still love riding it though - Especially the pop and burble on the overrun.
    Navy Boy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    4th October 2008 - 16:35
    Bike
    R100GSPD
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    9,771
    cant help thinking its a bit of a harsh comparison.1986? Thats a lifetime ago,and just about at the point that the "superbikes" were super.Before that they were just too heavy .Suzuki changed that with the gsxr 750 and 1000

  5. #5
    Join Date
    24th September 2004 - 06:46
    Bike
    '76 CB550 Super Sport
    Location
    On the road to nowhere...
    Posts
    6,652
    Having owned a cbx750 they handle all day rides no problem. When you start they feel heavy. The 16 inch wheel doesn't help. Once underway you hardly nptice it. You need to make sure the rear supension has the correct air pressure. With a few kms up say 50,000 to 70,000kms it's a good idea to replace the alternature tensioner as they are known to fail without much notice with posibly tragic consiquences.
    "Every time you set your ass on a bike, you're playing a game of Russian Roulette between yourself and your own stupidity."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    3rd October 2006 - 21:21
    Bike
    Breaking rocks
    Location
    in the hot sun
    Posts
    3,612
    Quote Originally Posted by BMWST? View Post
    cant help thinking its a bit of a harsh comparison.1986? Thats a lifetime ago,and just about at the point that the "superbikes" were super.Before that they were just too heavy .Suzuki changed that with the gsxr 750 and 1000
    That was kinda my point tho, about how much things have changed and also from 2003 to present.
    You can also make the same comparison with cars, so much has changed and mostly for the better.
    The only thing that really remains subjective is style/looks.
    Only a Rat can win a Rat Race!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    31st March 2005 - 02:18
    Bike
    CB919, Tuono, R1200GSA
    Location
    East Aucks
    Posts
    10,170
    Blog Entries
    140
    Kinda depends. The R1200GSA was the height of electronics in 2010, less than 10 years later and it's been pretty well eclipsed. Electronic suspension that you have to set yourself? Try active suspension that is monitoring multiple times a second. ABS? Nah, what about cornering ABS! What about ABS that you can leave on, on the front, but disable on the rear? Try traction control, my BMW takes the power away, simple as it gets. 3 settings, On, Off, Sport (less intrusive).

    I'm wondering if I want to add a Multistrada Enduro 1200 to the stable. 9 stage traction control, 4 or 5 stage ABS, 4 different ways of showing info on the dash, all combined, something like 300+ combinations. It's never going to stop...

    On the other hand, the 05 CB900 and 06 Tuono have no traction control (other than your right hand), no ABS, but they do have two trip meters! Flash stuff... although the Tuono is a bit more advanced with a lap timer etc. The only way you control the power output is by engaging your brain. Yes, I do enjoy the simplicity, but I'd only use the word reliable with the jap bike

    Yup, the electronics complicate things, but as you say, they can definitely aid the rideability.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jane Omorogbe from UK MSN on the KTM990SM
    It's barking mad and if it doesn't turn you into a complete loon within half an hour of cocking a leg over the lofty 875mm seat height, I'll eat my Arai.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •