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Thread: Can I use a under 50cc scooter for my learners exam

  1. #1
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    Can I use a under 50cc scooter for my learners exam

    Am I allowed to use an under 50cc scooter for my learners exam to get my motorcycle learner’s licence since moped don’t really count as “motorcycles”

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    Quote Originally Posted by jvlans View Post
    Am I allowed to use an under 50cc scooter for my learners exam to get my motorcycle learner’s licence since moped don’t really count as “motorcycles”
    There's no part of the learners exam that requires a vehicle to be used/demonstrated. The learners exam is purely written.

    Unless you are talking about the basic handling skills (BHS) component?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jvlans View Post
    Am I allowed to use an under 50cc scooter f
    Send a personal message to rastuscat, he is knowledgeable about such things.
    There is a grey blur, and a green blur. I try to stay on the grey one. - Joey Dunlop

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    Quote Originally Posted by jvlans View Post
    Am I allowed to use an under 50cc scooter for my learners exam to get my motorcycle learner’s licence since moped don’t really count as “motorcycles”
    I think you may find that many on this site are of the opinion ... scooters do not count as motorcycles.

    Basic handling test providers. Some providers allow you to do the test on a Motorcycle THEY provide.
    Check with the tester in your area that you intend to use for specific requirements/advice they have.

    https://www.google.co.nz/maps/@-46.4...7i13312!8i6656

    AA advice/requirements.

    https://www.aa.co.nz/drivers/motorcy...cycle-licence/
    Sweat wipes off. Road-rash doesn't.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pritch View Post
    Send a personal message to rastuscat, he is knowledgeable about such things.
    He probably hasn't made enough posts, for the site to allow him to PM anybody yet.
    Sweat wipes off. Road-rash doesn't.

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    Most places that do BHS will lend you a motorcycle to do the test on.
    If the words I say offend you, imagine the ones I keep to myself...

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    Quote Originally Posted by FJRider View Post
    I think you may find that many on this site are of the opinion ... scooters do not count as motorcycles.
    and hondas bare ghay

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    Inside word to follow.

    The Statement of Approved Conditions (the rules under which tests are conducted) requires that the Basic Handling Skills Test (BHST) is conducted on a "motorcycle".

    As such, you can't ride a moped on the test. It's not a motorcycle.

    But you can ride a scooter, as long as it's a motorcycle.

    Wowser, confused? Read on.

    The word "scooter" is not a legal definition used, it's just a word we have come to use to describe any number of vehicles. Some kids ride push scooters to school, some drink excessively and use an e-scooter to hurt themselves. Some scooters are mopeds, and some are motorcycles.

    We have come to regard scooters as little wee step through things, but picture a 650 Burgman or a C650 BMW. Scooters? Not many people would call them that, they are a bit big. Some would, though.

    Back to the point. The law refers to mopeds and motorcycles.

    A moped is a two-wheeled motor vehicle with an engine capacity of no more than 50cc or which has an alternative power source (for example, electricity). Its maximum speed capability is no more than 50km/h. This definition also includes three-wheeled vehicles registered as mopeds before 10 May 2011.Oct 4, 2012 So says NZTA.

    But to get a motorcycle licence you have to use a motorcycle to do the BHST. Providers who conduct BHST always have a motorcycle that you can use for the test, mostly GN125s from what I have seen. Easy to ride, you probably won't get out of second gear. You won't exceed 20 kmh by much during the BHST.

    But there's nothing that says you have to use their bike. You can use yours. This is a trap that I have seen people fall into. I've had clients turn up on, say, an AN125 Suzuki, thinking it'll be easier to pass the test on a bike with no clutch. It's not. Throttle control on a bike with CVT is variable, and in the tight, controlled course the BHST is done in, a CVT bike is actually harder to do than the mighty GN. CVT bikes have less back pressure, and tend to be on and off with the throttle at low speeds. The throttle response is also less defined on a CVT bike. Like, you wind on a bit, and there's a delay in the CVT catching up. When they do turn up, they tend to surge, to a degree.

    Of course, we are talking degrees of difficulty. It's not an easy test, but it's very doable.

    My suggestion is to use the GN )(or similar) that the school provides. It will mean spending some time coming to terms with a clutch, but that's a great skill to have, and you'll have less fear of bigger bikes if you learn to clutch on a smaller thing like a GN.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FJRider View Post
    I think you may find that many on this site are of the opinion ... scooters do not count as motorcycles.
    A Suzuki AN125 is legally a motorcycle (125 cc), but people who know no better call it a scooter. Many people ride them thinking their car licence is all they need.

    It's not even a grey area. Black and white. It's just commonly misunderstood.

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    Ignoring the question, as you've answered it very clearly.

    Just a comment on terminology...

    Quote Originally Posted by rastuscat View Post
    ... The word "scooter" is not a legal definition used, it's just a word we have come to use to describe any number of vehicles. Some kids ride push scooters to school, some drink excessively and use an e-scooter to hurt themselves. Some scooters are mopeds, and some are motorcycles.

    We have come to regard scooters as little wee step through things, but picture a 650 Burgman or a C650 BMW. Scooters? Not many people would call them that, they are a bit big. Some would, though...
    The word "scooter", as in motorscooter describes a particular style of powered two wheel vehicle with particular design characteristics. Just as "cruiser" or "dual-sport" or "motard" or "dirt bike" or "sports" describes a particular style of PTW with particular design and use characteristics. I'm sure it is quite possible to line up a selection of PTWs of about 500cc with one of each particular style represented.

    As for "moped"... NZTA's concept of one is not that which someone in Europe would necessarily recognise.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rastuscat View Post
    A Suzuki AN125 is legally a motorcycle (125 cc), but people who know no better call it a scooter. Many people ride them thinking their car licence is all they need.

    It's not even a grey area. Black and white. It's just commonly misunderstood.
    It's the stupidity of people that think all moped's are scooters. Not all scooters are created equal.

    You see a few dudes that "Hot-up" their moped and advertise "moped capable of over 100 km/hr ... can ride on a car license ... no WOF needed etc etc" and a few falling over themselves trying to buy it ...

    They are just Highway patrol bait ...
    Sweat wipes off. Road-rash doesn't.

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    Quote Originally Posted by caspernz View Post
    Most places that do BHS will lend you a motorcycle to do the test on.
    It is possible to rock up, never having ridden a motorcycle and pass the BSHT (it's not bullshit)

    A patient trainer is all that's needed.

    Definitely would be a good idea to do some training or some practise beforehand.

    No matter what, if your keen on riding a motorcycle on the motorway area.

    Get one that can maintain the limit and practise on that.
    AND
    Avoid windy and busy areas when first going out. Dont ask me how I know...
    AND
    If you think your ok and summon up the courage to go on a group ride. Make sure you tell them your new, because there is a lot of difference between what you think you can do and what others can

    It's only false thinking to use a motorcycle that's not suitable. Unless your just going around urban areas.

    It's worth the effort to go that little bit further and get a real bike.

    The provided motorcycles are well suited to the task at hand. They aren't trying to make it hard to pass. They just want to see if your capable of a few basic tasks.

    Bit of prattle. At airport and some bint has just opened her car door straight into mine. FFS

    READ AND UDESTAND

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    Quote Originally Posted by eldog View Post
    It is possible to rock up, never having ridden a motorcycle and pass the BSHT (it's not bullshit)

    A patient trainer is all that's needed.
    I agree with most of what you said, but this has to go with some degree of qualification.

    I've had many people turn up with the expectation that they are going to pass in one session, who then get sad when it takes longer than they thought.

    Riding a bike is one thing, riding it in the manner required to pass the BHST is a different issue altogether.

    The big thing is not turning their head in corners. Not looking far enough ahead. Dirt bike guys often turn up and they are focused on the patch of roadway 2 metres ahead of their front wheel.

    If you turn up with no riding experience, first you have to learn how to ride a bike, then you have to learn the test course, and remember what is expected, then you need to do the test.

    It's very rare for someone with nil experience to pass in one session. Very rare. Some people are naturally dexterous, and can learn quickly.

    Most can't pass in one session, if they haven't ridden before.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rastuscat View Post
    I agree with most of what you said, but this has to go with some degree of qualification.

    I've had many people turn up with the expectation that they are going to pass in one session, who then get sad when it takes longer than they thought.

    Riding a bike is one thing, riding it in the manner required to pass the BHST is a different issue altogether.

    The big thing is not turning their head in corners. Not looking far enough ahead. Dirt bike guys often turn up and they are focused on the patch of roadway 2 metres ahead of their front wheel.

    If you turn up with no riding experience, first you have to learn how to ride a bike, then you have to learn the test course, and remember what is expected, then you need to do the test.

    It's very rare for someone with nil experience to pass in one session. Very rare. Some people are naturally dexterous, and can learn quickly.

    Most can't pass in one session, if they haven't ridden before.
    I did it. By accident, not design. I thought I was booking a learn-to-ride course. The instructor should have stopped me when I said I'd never ridden before (at all)... I was blatantly honest about that fact. He was patient and I'm sure he spent more time with me than I'd booked. As he wrote up the cert, I asked him what my next steps were to gain my licence. He handed me the cert and said I needed to sit the theory test and that was all... I was quite surprised.

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    how does some one ride their own Motorcycle to a BHST legally, my understanding is that a person must do the BHST before they can even do the theory test.

    as a side note, when my son did his BHST, he passed with flying colours and very quickly, the instructor turned to him and said, "you are off a dairy farm aren't you", which of course he was, best place to learn to control a two wheeler is sitting behind cows for an hour or so each day, learn clutch control and balance along with numerous other handling skills at low speed
    Last edited by russd7; 16th December 2019 at 18:32. Reason: fixing the error of my ways

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