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Thread: CB250F Hornet Clutch Replacement

  1. #1
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    18th October 2018 - 15:38
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    CB250F Hornet Clutch Replacement

    Hi,

    Wanting to change the clutch on my cb250 Hornet, it's a 1997 model.

    Clutch is slipping, so would like to change it.

    Any idea where I can get the fibre/friction plates?

    Cheers,

  2. #2
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    24th September 2004 - 06:46
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    First all pull the the clutch pack off( While obbserving were the individual plates(metal/fibre and ringsare fitted in the pack) Check to see if the plates are still within factory tolerances. If so clean them of oil residue and scuff them up with a bit of fine emery paper on a flat surface.. When finished clean them up again to remove any emery paper and fibre residue and refit to basket in threir correct positions.. Also while you are at check the length of the clutch springs and make sure they are within tolerances. Also check for any thing alse that may appear damaged or worn. Fit the outer casing using an new gasket if needed.

    https://www.bike-parts-honda.com/hon...061/E_05/1/909

    Go to a forums dedicated for these machines. There you will find a wealth of information.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bonez View Post
    First all pull the the clutch pack off( While obbserving were the individual plates(metal/fibre and ringsare fitted in the pack) Check to see if the plates are still within factory tolerances. If so clean them of oil residue and scuff them up with a bit of fine emery paper on a flat surface.. When finished clean them up again to remove any emery paper and fibre residue and refit to basket in threir correct positions.. Also while you are at check the length of the clutch springs and make sure they are within tolerances. Also check for any thing alse that may appear damaged or worn. Fit the outer casing using an new gasket if needed.

    https://www.bike-parts-honda.com/hon...061/E_05/1/909

    Go to a forums dedicated for these machines. There you will find a wealth of information.
    Excellent stuff.

    I when rolling on the throttle, it does ‘whine’ so the clutch is definitely worn.

    I’ll do the above steps and see how I go!

    Cheers,

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnishi View Post
    Excellent stuff.

    I when rolling on the throttle, it does ‘whine’ so the clutch is definitely worn.

    I’ll do the above steps and see how I go!

    Cheers,
    Is someone also able to confirm it actually is the clutch plate? So when I was riding, I gave it some go, and it went from 8k rpm so 11k rpm in no time - which means it’s slipping right?!

    Got the old man saying to try adjust the clutch cable - because that might be the issue?

    Any expert opinion is much appreciated!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnishi View Post
    Is someone also able to confirm it actually is the clutch plate? So when I was riding, I gave it some go, and it went from 8k rpm so 11k rpm in no time - which means it’s slipping right?!

    Got the old man saying to try adjust the clutch cable - because that might be the issue?

    Any expert opinion is much appreciated!
    Is your clutch lever free play set up correctly at the lever/actuator arm?

    Try to go back to first principles. Have a look the service manual which is probably available in a 250Hornet forum and try not to over think problems.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bonez View Post
    Is your clutch lever free play set up correctly at the lever/actuator arm?

    Try to go back to first principles. Have a look the service manual which is probably available in a 250Hornet forum and try not to over think problems.
    Cheers.

    Anyone know where else I can get the parts from?

    I have checked that link above, coming up to close to $400 NZD; shipping itself being $100.

    Thanks

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnishi View Post
    Cheers.

    Anyone know where else I can get the parts from?

    I have checked that link above, coming up to close to $400 NZD; shipping itself being $100.

    Thanks
    Ty comparing the price for the parts from your local honda dealer.

    The two issues with the clutch are ...

    1. The clutch cable gets stretched through normal use. This is known to be happening when you pull the lever in and and little or nothing happens regarding the workings of the clutch. The clutch cable will have no tension in it and lots of play (a very small amount of play is normal) with the lever at rest. If the cable and lever is incorrectly adjusted ... there might be too much tension on the cable and the clutch may be actually partially engaged with the lever at rest. This can even be caused by the outer cable for the clutch hooked up somewhere. That should be checked to see if the entire length of it is free and loose first.

    2. The (fibre) clutch plates do wear. Often individual fibre plates (one or more) may even break up or disintegrate. This leaves an uneven spacing with a metal plate on metal plate in the clutch. Or partial plates making poor contact. And so it slips with just throttle action. The other possible issue is that the wrong oil was used in the bike. Some put car engine oil in their motorcycle (to save themselves money). This usually has additives that reduce friction in the engine. Good in the engine ... but not good in the clutch. It tends to gum up the fiber clutch plates. The result being as you described. The fibre plates can just get worn thin and smooth with just continual use with dirty oil gumming up the fibre plates.

    You can drain the oil and pull the outer cover off yourself. And actually see what the issue is. Warm the engine up a bit first ... warm oil flows faster and easier. Check with your fingers for "Bits" in the oil you drain out. Bits of steel or fibre or "other stuff" don't enhance clutch longevity.

    A clutch rebuild isn't difficult to do ... especially with a workshop manual at hand. But the steps I've given will help you find the actual issue.

    Good luck.
    Sweat wipes off. Road-rash doesn't.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJRider View Post
    Ty comparing the price for the parts from your local honda dealer.

    The two issues with the clutch are ...

    1. The clutch cable gets stretched through normal use. This is known to be happening when you pull the lever in and and little or nothing happens regarding the workings of the clutch. The clutch cable will have no tension in it and lots of play (a very small amount of play is normal) with the lever at rest. If the cable and lever is incorrectly adjusted ... there might be too much tension on the cable and the clutch may be actually partially engaged with the lever at rest. This can even be caused by the outer cable for the clutch hooked up somewhere. That should be checked to see if the entire length of it is free and loose first.

    2. The (fibre) clutch plates do wear. Often individual fibre plates (one or more) may even break up or disintegrate. This leaves an uneven spacing with a metal plate on metal plate in the clutch. Or partial plates making poor contact. And so it slips with just throttle action. The other possible issue is that the wrong oil was used in the bike. Some put car engine oil in their motorcycle (to save themselves money). This usually has additives that reduce friction in the engine. Good in the engine ... but not good in the clutch. It tends to gum up the fiber clutch plates. The result being as you described. The fibre plates can just get worn thin and smooth with just continual use with dirty oil gumming up the fibre plates.

    You can drain the oil and pull the outer cover off yourself. And actually see what the issue is. Warm the engine up a bit first ... warm oil flows faster and easier. Check with your fingers for "Bits" in the oil you drain out. Bits of steel or fibre or "other stuff" don't enhance clutch longevity.

    A clutch rebuild isn't difficult to do ... especially with a workshop manual at hand. But the steps I've given will help you find the actual issue.

    Good luck.
    Got the plates etc.

    I can’t seem to get the clutch plate cover off, so I’ve taken the springs off but when I’m trying to take the cover off that holds the clutch plates - the entire cover moves. What can I do to stop it from rotating?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnishi View Post
    What can I do to stop it from rotating?
    From memory ... the last one I did was a Kawasaki 100 trail bike quite a few years back ... Put it in gear.

    A broomstick (or similar) between the spokes above the swing arm ... will stop the back wheel spinning.
    Sweat wipes off. Road-rash doesn't.

  10. #10
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    Why would you need to remove the clutch basket? Undo the bolts that hold the springs, pull the clutch pressure plate, remove the driving and driven plates, replace in reverse order. Sorted. New springs while you are in there wouldn't go amiss, but if the spring free length is within spec they will be ok. Dont go crazy tightening the spring retainer screws, (or any other screws /bolts for that matter) Service manual and torque wrench are your friends.
    it's not a bad thing till you throw a KLR into the mix.
    those cheap ass bitches can do anything with ductape.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pete376403 View Post
    Why would you need to remove the clutch basket? Undo the bolts that hold the springs, pull the clutch pressure plate, remove the driving and driven plates, replace in reverse order. Sorted. New springs while you are in there wouldn't go amiss, but if the spring free length is within spec they will be ok. Dont go crazy tightening the spring retainer screws, (or any other screws /bolts for that matter) Service manual and torque wrench are your friends.
    this photo might make it clear. There's a housing covering the plates, and each time I try loosen it, it moves. I've put it into first gear and held down the rear brake but also no luck.

    I've also tried to use a breaker bar to try get it loose, but no luck as well.

    Let me know what you think.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnishi View Post
    this photo might make it clear. There's a housing covering the plates, and each time I try loosen it, it moves. I've put it into first gear and held down the rear brake but also no luck.

    I've also tried to use a breaker bar to try get it loose, but no luck as well.

    Let me know what you think.
    probably need to impact wrench this.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnishi View Post
    Let me know what you think.

    Attached image is of your clutch assembly (I think).

    It may differ to the ones I have dealt with.

    BUT ... it appears that the outer center nut holds it all the clutch components in place, in my experience the retaining springs held the metal and fibre plates in place.

    The clutch breakdown image seems to indicate that outer nut holds the whole dam thing in place.

    Unless there are violent objections from others ... put the bike in first gear. Strong Broomstick through the spokes above the swingarm ... and try undoing the center nut. Firm consistent pressure with a socket set. I see no sign of any folded locking tabs in you photo or the diagram I posted.

    Quick question before you try the above ... finger the eight outer clutch tabs in the basket ... Is there any movement with them .. are they (sort of) loose in the basket .. ??
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    Sweat wipes off. Road-rash doesn't.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnishi View Post
    probably need to impact wrench this.
    It may be a left hand thread. Find a workshop manual.
    Sweat wipes off. Road-rash doesn't.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJRider View Post
    Attached image is of your clutch assembly (I think).

    It may differ to the ones I have dealt with.

    BUT ... it appears that the outer center nut holds it all the clutch components in place, in my experience the retaining springs held the metal and fibre plates in place.

    The clutch breakdown image seems to indicate that outer nut holds the whole dam thing in place.

    Unless there are violent objections from others ... put the bike in first gear. Strong Broomstick through the spokes above the swingarm ... and try undoing the center nut. Firm consistent pressure with a socket set. I see no sign of any folded locking tabs in you photo or the diagram I posted.

    Quick question before you try the above ... finger the eight outer clutch tabs in the basket ... Is there any movement with them .. are they (sort of) loose in the basket .. ??
    Yes they are loose in the basket, i can move them back and fourth. Is this normal?

    I was thinking to pick up a torque wrench tomorrow and just use that.

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