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Thread: Oil analysis - new bikes

  1. #31
    Join Date
    15th February 2021 - 08:25
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    Suzuki GSX250
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    Blenheim
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    Rookie question here, if the engine shares the oil with the clutch friction plates and they wear, how does the friction material that’s worn off and floating about not damage the rest of the engine?

  2. #32
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    1st September 2007 - 21:01
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    1993 Yamaha FJ 1200
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puddles View Post
    Rookie question here, if the engine shares the oil with the clutch friction plates and they wear, how does the friction material that’s worn off and floating about not damage the rest of the engine?
    Take out your oil filter and see the result.
    When life throws you a curve ... Lean into it ...

  3. #33
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    1st September 2007 - 21:01
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    Quote Originally Posted by R650R View Post
    I’d hazard a guess the oil temp is more stable and lags water temp?
    I lived in Singapore for a few years (With NZ Army) and rode a '76 CB750F1. I had an oil cooler fitted. It was a bit like a radiator for the oil.

    I'm not sure if the benefit was in the air cooling the of the oil ... or just that there was more oil in the system.
    When life throws you a curve ... Lean into it ...

  4. #34
    Join Date
    15th February 2017 - 13:17
    Bike
    '21 Ducati Multistrada 950S
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJRider View Post
    Cooling on a water/liquid cooled motorcycle on a hot day ... through the inner city streets was always a worry. The fan can only do so much with the air temp over 20 deg C. It was never good for the rider either.

    At Highway speeds it was seldom an issue.
    Some bikes do come with additional oil coolers on top of the coolant radiators (some have fins, others have a second oil cooler). But as you say, air movement around the bike is the key to keeping things within acceptable temperatures.

    Thankfully for my Jeep, it has a coolant radiator, engine oil cooler and transmission fluid cooler - all separate from each other. This is to work around low speed off-road work where air flow is minimal.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    15th February 2017 - 13:17
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    '21 Ducati Multistrada 950S
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJRider View Post
    I lived in Singapore for a few years (With NZ Army) and rode a '76 CB750F1. I had an oil cooler fitted. It was a bit like a radiator for the oil.

    I'm not sure if the benefit was in the air cooling the of the oil ... or just that there was more oil in the system.
    I would probably say both.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    25th March 2004 - 17:22
    Bike
    RZ496/Street Triple R/GasGas/ etc etc
    Location
    Wellington. . ok the hutt
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    18,383
    My point was I don't think you are breaking down the oil. Additionally super low stress typically city riding.

    Also riding in Auckland should only be done at 3 to 4am in the morning of a Tuesday.
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  7. #37
    Join Date
    2nd March 2018 - 15:32
    Bike
    1998 Yamaha R1
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    Auckland
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    879
    Synthetics will easily take 150°. But coolant won't.

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