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Thread: Slow handling questions.....

  1. #1
    Join Date
    5th January 2006 - 16:36
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    2004, Suzuki SV650
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    Slow handling questions.....

    Hi all, so I've been out trying to practice some slow riding... (ie. u turns, etc...) I have been known to be very clumsy at slow speeds and I have no trouble with pulling out smoothly, etc but I have been having a bit of trouble with slow conering, etc...

    My main problems are when controlling the bike with the handlebar all the way turned to one side or close to it (ie, U-turns), I don't know if it's normal but if the bike is coasting at idle and I give it a little bit of throttle (very gently) the bike lurches forward a little in first gear (ie, there is quite a bit of difference between idle and minimum throttle input if you see what I mean), and this is making it quite diffiicult when I can't turn the handlebar anymore and I'm trying to correct from over-leaning by giving it throttle, and I have ended up with sore ankle several times (from putting the foot down at the last minute)

    Can anyone offer any advice to help me along on my low speed handling???

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
    Use the clutch to feed in the power smoothly...

  3. #3
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    24th February 2006 - 13:53
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    Personally I would say don't focus on turning your handlebars as much as you can, rather look where you want to go and you should naturally go there. Try to keep your feet firmly on the footrests as well, you will be much more balanced that way.
    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

  4. #4
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    14th December 2005 - 21:09
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    Most bikes under very low speed cornering, in first gear, have sudden on off progression of power because of the gearing.
    As has been suggested, you need to feather the clutch to smooth this sudden transition. There really is no other way to deal with it.

    Fuel injected models make this even more severe.
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  5. #5
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    23rd February 2006 - 14:28
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    When I u-turn, I do this
    • Constant throttle
    • Control speed with the clutch
    • Ride the back brake


    Riding the back brake tends to balance things out somehow.

  6. #6
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    26th February 2005 - 15:10
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    You do not normally need full lock for a in-street U turn. Lean the bike. And use the clutch to feed power in smoothly. In my observation the mistake most people make with U turns is going too slow. Think of a U turn as just two 90 degree bends put together. For some reason people are happy to go through a 90 degree bend , leaning the bike at moderate speed . But put two of them together and call it a U turn and the want to slow right down to less than walking pace and wobble round dead upright.

    Extremely slow turns on full lock are best left to the trials chaps.

    I can turn the BMW within a lane width, by leaning it.
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  7. #7
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    23rd March 2006 - 12:15
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    As all above i.e. constant revs, clutch at friction point and I also find a bit of counter-balance works a treat. Biggest thing - look where you want to go, not at the ground.

  8. #8
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    15th September 2004 - 22:33
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    I'm no expert, but I find it easiest to try to get the bike into second if possible, it runs smoother and is less jerky than first. Use the clutch to control speed and the back brake to move the rear end around. Watch where you want to go,i.e, your exit point, not what you don't want to ride into, and the bike will follow your eyes as your body tends to do so too, and practice, practice, practice. Good luck.
    Mrs KD

  9. #9
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    5th August 2005 - 14:30
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    Smooth turns tighter than full lock at low speeds can be achieved with a little practice.

    First off learn throttle control. Practice using the throttle in say second then get used to it in first. Mostly you will be able to control it with a little practice in say an empty carpark. Sometimes it is easier whilst you are doing this to clamp your thumb across onto the switch block to steady your hand.
    And yes some bikes you do need to use the clutch to control the power delivery. Though in reality this is not that often.

    Speed control is critical to low speed handling and you really must get that first.

    To perform a low speed turn tighter than full lock.
    Once you have the speed under control, get in a car park with plenty of room and go around in circles as you do wind the circle tighter and tighter all the while adding weight to your outside peg. You will find that you can get to a point (with practice) where you can safely lift you butt off of the seat and at full lock, push the bike down into the turn thereby reducing your turn radius.

    I should note that this is more effective on bigger bikes and/or bikes with a long wheel base and/or higher centre of gravity. Not that it wont benefit every bike, but the benefit will be more profound on a larger bike.

    Oh and for dozens more tips, well you know what to do...
    An RRRS course of course.
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  10. #10
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    19th November 2003 - 18:45
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    Put a foot down, hold the front brake , put on some throttle and spin the rear up and round you go!

  11. #11
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    20th April 2003 - 08:28
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    Keep your bum with the seat and your upper body straight up. Then you can counter steer, feather the clutch to keep speed low (and turn radius tight).

    Worse come to worse, do 3-point turn, but beware you might not be able to push your bike backwards if the road camber is too steep.
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  12. #12
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    20th April 2003 - 08:28
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    Quote Originally Posted by sAsLEX
    Put a foot down, hold the front brake , put on some throttle and spin the rear up and round you go!
    Or pull wheelie to balance point in as low speed as you can and do a very tight donuts, preferably standing up with 1 foot on grabrail. Eh?
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  13. #13
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    5th August 2005 - 14:30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmoot
    Keep your bum with the seat and your upper body straight up. Then you can counter steer, feather the clutch to keep speed low (and turn radius tight).
    A low speed counter steer???
    Quote Originally Posted by Tank
    You say "no one wants to fuck with some large bloke on a really angry sounding bike" but the truth of the matter is that you are a balding middle-aged ice-cream seller from Edgecume who wears a hello kitty t-shirt (in your profile pic) and your angry sounding bike is a fucken hyoshit - not some big assed harley with a human skull on the front.

  14. #14
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    4th January 2006 - 19:30
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    Here is really good advice (since I do a lot of low speed complicated stuff).. turn your handlebars, and chuck your body around - lean over / put your bike at lower angles than yourself.. tends to work wonders..

    If you've got a bmx or mountain bike / if you've had experience on those, it's exactly the same
    “There's nothing more exhilarating than pointing out the shortcomings of others, is there? ”-Clerks

  15. #15
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    19th November 2003 - 18:45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmoot
    Or pull wheelie to balance point in as low speed as you can and do a very tight donuts, preferably standing up with 1 foot on grabrail. Eh?
    nah let it rest on the 12 bar and go grab a coffee while it slowly wheelies in a circle in its park then just hop on when its pointing in the right direction!

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