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Thread: Setting up for adventure riding

  1. #46
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    13th April 2007 - 18:26
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    Two essentials:
    Chewing gum.(better than chewing ya tongue, or inner cheek.
    Wallet and cash. (amazing what you can bribe ya way out of).

    Chewing gum makes a great patch job on all sorts of broken things, if you got the time to let it set.

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by XP@ View Post
    " 41 6'34.02"S 17453'31.46"E"
    Will you look at that...I live just around the corner from you...

  3. #48
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    7th January 2007 - 18:47
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    Thumbs up Just what you want....

    Quote Originally Posted by Zukin View Post
    I wouldnt ditch the radios, but want I want to do is the following

    2 x UHF radios
    2 x Earpieces to go inside helmet
    2 x mics also inside helmet

    and to switches to attach to the handle bar, then all I do is press the button and talk.
    Cheers Scott
    You can get this exact setup fairly cheaply from Jaycar Electronics.....

    Cheers, Stu
    My KLR thinks it's a Hyundai - running happily at the red-line hour after hour.....

  4. #49
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    Thumbs up Spare Fuse

    Quote Originally Posted by Moki View Post
    I would recommend including the following when the going really gets tough:
    -zip ties
    -spare fuses
    -spare bulbs
    -tie down straps (at least 2)
    Totally agree about the spare fuse thing, but would also add a small torch

    Was in darkness north of Wellington near the old Tui Brewery in the middle of bloody no-where while on the Southern Cross when the main fuse suddenly blew ( that's where I found out that a still working indicator can come in very handy in finding the road while slowing down to a stop )

    Standing there in the dark while unloading my gear to get the seat off to change the fuse, I really appreciated the small torch I'd taken along. There was a spare fuse in the fuseholder luckily as I hadn't taken one along - I had almost everything but....

    ( I had briefly considered walking back to the Tui Brewery for help, but realised that by 11.30pm, the Tui chicks would have gone home for the day anyway.... )

    Note to self, replace spare fuse in fusebox :-)

    Stu
    My KLR thinks it's a Hyundai - running happily at the red-line hour after hour.....

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by tri boy View Post
    Two essentials:
    Chewing gum.(better than chewing ya tongue, or inner cheek.
    Wallet and cash. (amazing what you can bribe ya way out of).

    Chewing gum makes a great patch job on all sorts of broken things, if you got the time to let it set.
    Carrying the chewing gum in the spares kit yes - chewing while riding - risky if you crash, there's every chance of inhaling it. Get a foreign object in your lung and you'll cough for the rest of your life (assuming it doesn't choke you on the way down)
    it's not a bad thing till you throw a KLR into the mix.
    those cheap ass bitches can do anything with ductape.
    (PostalDave on ADVrider)

  6. #51
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    19th August 2003 - 15:32
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    That's why it's called Adventure Riding

    Quote Originally Posted by pete376403 View Post
    Carrying the chewing gum in the spares kit yes - chewing while riding - risky if you crash, there's every chance of inhaling it. Get a foreign object in your lung and you'll cough for the rest of your life (assuming it doesn't choke you on the way down)


    I had no idea Auntie Helen was a member here.
    I say chew gum and run with sissors at the same time...

  7. #52
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    11th June 2007 - 22:07
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    where r u going in nz for 20 days .....with no one anywhere for a week at a time ?
    top of mt cook ?
    Id have about a quarter what you said

    Just a thought what about road side assist?

  8. #53
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    20th November 2005 - 22:24
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    Quote Originally Posted by homer View Post
    ...Just a thought what about road side assist?
    Roadside assist implies you think we might actually have our breakdowns somewhere near an actual paved road or somewhere the will service. Not usually the case.
    www.remotemoto.com - a serious site for serious ADV riders, the ultimate resource in the making.
    Check out my videos on Youtube including... the 2011 Dusty Butt 1K - Awakino Challenge and others.

  9. #54
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    9th May 2007 - 11:14
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    I have been told that insted of carrying spare levers, file a break line halfway along the lever so they can snap off if they hit hard, you are then left with a stubby lever which you can then slip a short piece of garden hose over to give you a full lever again.
    "I came into this game for the action, the excitement... go anywhere, travel light,... get in, get out,... wherever there's trouble, a man alone... Now they got the whole country sectioned off; you can't make a move without a form."

    Paved roads are just another example of wasted tax payer dollars.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanohit View Post
    I have been told that insted of carrying spare levers, file a break line halfway along the lever so they can snap off if they hit hard, you are then left with a stubby lever which you can then slip a short piece of garden hose over to give you a full lever again.
    I've found my bark busters have been great for stopping the buggers getting damaged at all. Get ones with decent fairings on them and they'll keep some of the wind and water off your hands as well.
    http://wolfmotorcycling.freehostia.com/
    Quote Originally Posted by jrandom View Post
    We 'athiests' consider Wolf 'one of us' inasmuch as his approach to matters of philosophy mirrors our own. The fact that he chooses to live by tenets driven by a fantasy of the supernatural that he finds personally appealing and culturally relevant is neither here nor there.
    Quote Originally Posted by Shiny side up View Post
    It is amazing what you can do with a big hammer and a lot of care.
    Thank Eris for the FSM!!

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf View Post
    I've found my bark busters have been great for stopping the buggers getting damaged at all. Get ones with decent fairings on them and they'll keep some of the wind and water off your hands as well.
    Bark busters are great for protecting the levers up to a point and in fact take a lot of punishment off the whole bike itself. You are right too about wind protection as it helps prevent painfully numb fingers in the cold which is my personal hate about biking.
    What I do is loosen the lever bolts a little until they are firm but when you whack them they turn on the bars instead of breaking, proven this works for motard crashes anyway. No need to take a spare then. I am about to set up for Adventure riding and my objective is to carry as little weight as possible - which means just essentials not a huge list of gear and replacement parts that I will probably never use. The more you carry - the more weight you bike is - the more likely you are to fall - the more likely you are to break things etc etc.

  12. #57
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    Tools !

    Far queues idea about dumping the stock toolkit items has some merit although some of the lists of things on here are surely enough for expedition riders not adventure riders. The spanners you get are crap and are more likely to strip a bolt head than turn it, so replace with decent ones (ring spanners). Are you like me and instead of using the tool in your toolkit to loosen the back axle get out a dirty great socket spanner instead so when you need to loosen it at the roadside its way to tight for the pathetic tool in the toolkit?

    MOTORCYCLISTS MUST ALWAYS CARRY
    Tying wire
    Duct Tape.

  13. #58
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    Some guy has a sig on here that says:
    Always carry duct tape and CRC.
    CRC for the things that don't but should move.
    Duct tape for the things that do but shouldn't move.
    "I came into this game for the action, the excitement... go anywhere, travel light,... get in, get out,... wherever there's trouble, a man alone... Now they got the whole country sectioned off; you can't make a move without a form."

    Paved roads are just another example of wasted tax payer dollars.

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by GaZBur View Post
    Far queues idea about dumping the stock toolkit items has some merit although some of the lists of things on here are surely enough for expedition riders not adventure riders. The spanners you get are crap and are more likely to strip a bolt head than turn it, so replace with decent ones (ring spanners). Are you like me and instead of using the tool in your toolkit to loosen the back axle get out a dirty great socket spanner instead so when you need to loosen it at the roadside its way to tight for the pathetic tool in the toolkit?

    MOTORCYCLISTS MUST ALWAYS CARRY
    Tying wire
    Duct Tape.
    Nuthin' wrong with KTM toolkits.
    I dunno if it's been mentioned, but a pair of quality vice grips are very handy. Not only can they be used as a spanner, you can use 'em as an emergency gear shifter or to hold things together...

  15. #60
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    24th January 2005 - 15:45
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    Tools.

    As my bike didn't have the tool kit when I got it, I've had no choice re assembling my own.

    I carry a 1/2" ratchet drive with a 1/2-1/4" adapter and a selection of sockets in addition to a small selection of decent-quality combination (open-end/ring) spanners. My screwdriver is an "L" shaped bit driver and I have a selection of hex bits in my kit along with slot and phillips bits - it makes a great screwdriver-and-allen-key.

    Still lacking a few essential tools (like a plug socket) and I'm planning on getting 3 "ring-spanner/tyre iron" combinations (2x22mm and 1x19mm) to cut down on weight/bulk (rather than carrying three large spanners and a set of tyre irons).
    http://wolfmotorcycling.freehostia.com/
    Quote Originally Posted by jrandom View Post
    We 'athiests' consider Wolf 'one of us' inasmuch as his approach to matters of philosophy mirrors our own. The fact that he chooses to live by tenets driven by a fantasy of the supernatural that he finds personally appealing and culturally relevant is neither here nor there.
    Quote Originally Posted by Shiny side up View Post
    It is amazing what you can do with a big hammer and a lot of care.
    Thank Eris for the FSM!!

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