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Thread: Tools required for a motorcyclist

  1. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by pete-blen View Post
    when was the last time yer seen a home handy man screw compressor.... links would be nice...
    About an hour ago. I have a trailered XA 96, 185cfm Atlas Copco that I used for sandblasting and thrust boring, but now just gets used as a storage space. Not your average home workshop item though, I admit.

    P.S. you can get some really cool smaller screw compressors nowadays. 75cfm for the home handy person is pretty good.
    For a man is a slave to whatever has mastered him. Keep an open mind, just dont let your brains fall out.

  2. #137
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    19th March 2014 - 11:43
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    Try this company, huge online web store. I have bought from there and great service. Nearly everything you need. www.qualitytools.co.nz

  3. #138
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    12th October 2008 - 00:13
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    Online tool purchases

    I have been getting a lot of parts and hand tools off amazon lately, they have some crazy cheap deals on quality tools.
    Not all tools ship to nz though, you can set up a you post acc with nz post to get around that though.

  4. #139
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    25th March 2004 - 17:22
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    Had to post this for your reading pleasure.
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    I've been told. Dreaming`s free.
    Think I'll go, back to sleep.
    Everybody listen, voices in my head
    Everybody listen, do yours say, what mine says?

  5. #140
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    thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by F5 Dave View Post
    Ok so you own one of these motorcycle thingies & it has occurred to you that sometimes they need maintenance, repairs or adjustments in the workshop.
    (I’m not intending for this to become a ‘what should I carry’ thread)

    What does one do about tools?

    a) Rely on the toolkit (unless it was 2nd hand & therefore stolen by the last owner) as this is what the manufacturer specified & using unbranded tools may invalidate the warranty?
    b) Empty the coffers & tell the Snap-on man to just come & deliver the whole cattledog job-lot?
    c) Buy one of those every-tool-included suitcase from Supercheap or similar?
    d) None of the above

    OK so for the workshop you are setting up you will probably be on a budget, after all you just spent most of your wedge on buying the bike. But if you decide that you’d like to perform more maintenance yourself then you will need the proper tools or you will cause more damage than you are trying to save by taking it to the shop.

    Ok we’ll start with option a) these tools are the cheapest bidders the manufacturers could find that an owner could remove some parts of the motorcycle at least once without causing too much damage to cause a rash of warranty claims. Nasty.
    b) Are you a professional mechanic? No didn’t think so.
    c) These kits are made by the companies rejected in a) for being too low quality. Avoid like the plague.

    So d) it is.

    Maybe if I start with a bit of a list, people can poke holes in it & I can edit the main list at the start of the thread.

    I’m going to start with the theory that most motorcyclists are typically cheapskates and will buy on price. To some extent one has to proceed with caution. One might not need all these tools if this is just a passing fad. But generally there’s no tool so expensive as one that damages what you are trying to fix & then needs replacing with progressively more expensive tools.

    So what we are looking for are ‘fit for purpose’ good value tools.

    I am often amazed at what people try to get by with & the absolute rubbish that come as suitcase kits.

    Maybe 2 lists; bare minimum & nice to have.





    Ok Bare Minimum

    Hammer Ideally large ball peen hammer, but can make do with a woodwork claw if you already have one.
    Rubber Mallet Cheap & will save axle threads when you are tempted to bash with hammer or other tool
    Screwdrivers Both Flatblade & Crosshead. Several sizes of each. Cheap ones will let you down. Push when using cross head. Screwdrivers are not levers, never use them as such.
    Cheap flatblade screwdrivers These are in fact sacrificial chisels & levers. You’re going to do it so have some specifically for it & never use for other purposes. Obviously don’t try to lever things that will be damaged, like ally sidecovers.
    Allen keys Don’t buy that rubbish on a spring set. By a proper set of ½ doz metric in a row holder
    Impact driver Blue box type from Ripco will be fine.
    Pliers Fine nose & sturdy type. Some linesman cutters as well
    Circlip pliers One of those combination internal/external sets will suffice, even if they make you learn some new swear words
    Spanners Metric as a set is more economical, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 17, 19mm at a min
    Socket set As above. I prefer ½” drive as they are more sturdy, Many prefer 1/4 drive; preference. This is probably the bigger ticket item as a set. Save money & frustration, you will never need an imperial mixed set. It would be nice to get some larger sizes as well, 22, 24, 27, 30 for instance. Spark plug sockets to fit your bike may be nice. Pick carefully.
    Big Cresent Wrench These make fabulous benders. Not so hot on nuts & bolts. Be very careful.
    Vice Larger the better, but can be cheap. Large coachbolts & mount to a bench or anything
    Drill Many bargains about are ok, beware too cheap drill bits.
    Hack saw
    Files
    Kneepads or some carpet
    Rags Do you really wear that BonJovi T anymore?
    Pad For writing down those parts required
    Hand cleaner Washing powder at a push

    The nice to have list/buy as required list

    Tool box Forget the million dollar one, a couple of big plastic ones are ok, but if can set up a board close to the work area with some screws & pencil some outlines. This will save hours of rooting around. Really.
    Workbench Something sturdy to work on, build or 2nd hand
    Bike bench Something sturdy to work on, build or 2nd hand, about 400 high. Need plank to load & a paddock stand or tiedowns etc to secure.
    Seat Cut down a seat if no bike bench.
    Torque wrench Don’t buy one too large, say around the 2-40NM range is where you will be using it most.
    Flywheel puller Useful on 2 stroke dirtbikes etc Only a few different types
    T Bars Cross head screwdriver & 8/10/12mm socket will make life in the garage more joyous. As will a T bar allen set (surprisingly the $20 supercheap one is good). Won’t fit in all places so still need std set.
    Long wrecking bar Life is nice when you have some leverage. An ~800mm long fixed bar for your sockets will be valuable. Don’t try to use one of those cheapo torque wrenches, the bending makes them useless.
    Compressor Really they are so cheap & blowing out carbs & pumping tyres will make you wonder how you did without one. It’s at this stage where a slightly bigger one will drive an impact wrench better, but you can get by with a small one most of the time. No you can't spray with it. Need a really big one.
    Impact Wrench Don’t use to do nuts up with, but great for shocking nuts off.
    Decent Circlip pliers for external & internal.
    Drill press Small ok, mounted & get a mini vice for holding work
    Bench Grinder One side for grinding steel, the other fit a wire brush. Beware of where things that slip out of hands will get flung at 100mph (grinders were never metricised so only fling things at 100mph). Mount as far away from bike or car, ideally near the messy drill/vice area.
    Verniers Digital are easiest but mech will suffice.
    Mulitimeter Dick Smith will provide a cheapo one for $20. Read the manual & you will work out how to use one or just experiment & look on the web.
    Soldering Iron & solder & heatshrink
    Torch Small but powerful

    additions While suggested or I think of it:
    Vice grips Used with care can be valuable.
    Vice grip with a chain Great for holding flywheels etc.
    In Hex Sockets
    Needle nose vice grips
    Ratchet spanners
    Poly (multi) grips large Use with caution
    thank you for suggestion

  6. #141
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    25th March 2004 - 17:22
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    Golly keep forgetting about this thread. Just read it from start to finish for old times sake.
    I've been told. Dreaming`s free.
    Think I'll go, back to sleep.
    Everybody listen, voices in my head
    Everybody listen, do yours say, what mine says?

  7. #142
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    I usually use a spare wheel axle as a rotor/flywheel puller. Tighten the axle up as tight as you can get then give the hex end a good wollop with a club hammer. Cover the end of the axle with a bit of wood if you don't want the hex end damaged.

  8. #143
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    Didn't read the whole thread but did do a search and the term JIS, as in Japanese Industry Standard, doesn't seem to appear. Philips screw drivers will root a JIS screw, no questions asked. Older Japanese bikes were JIS all over - look for the little dot on the screw head near the + slot. More modern bikes seem to be put together with either small external hex head screws or socket head screws.

    Favourite place to find buggered JIS screws would be carburetors, float bowl screws and diaphragm cover screws.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hozan-JIS-4-J...%20JIS%20screw.
    it's not a bad thing till you throw a KLR into the mix.
    those cheap ass bitches can do anything with ductape.
    (PostalDave on ADVrider)

  9. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by pete376403 View Post
    Didn't read the whole thread but did do a search and the term JIS, as in Japanese Industry Standard, doesn't seem to appear. Philips screw drivers will root a JIS screw, no questions asked. Older Japanese bikes were JIS all over - look for the little dot on the screw head near the + slot. More modern bikes seem to be put together with either small external hex head screws or socket head screws.

    Favourite place to find buggered JIS screws would be carburetors, float bowl screws and diaphragm cover screws.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hozan-JIS-4-J...%20JIS%20screw.
    That is so, so true.
    Manopausal.

  10. #145
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    25th March 2004 - 17:22
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    When I wrote the thread I knew not of such a standard.

    I am since a convert and have bits for my Bahco rachet screwdriver and also std Vessel JIS in size 1 and 2 bought off ebay.

    I always thought my favourite T handle Daytona cross head was good. A mate put me onto it when he was with the importer. Of course its Japanese. . .

    I have a feeling some impact screwdrivers use them too as they don't cam out like Philips.


    But to be fair you can muddle along with local stuff if you push, like I advised all those years ago.

    As such I would highly recommend them but expect most layperson to get going without them.

    Until they progress to the next level. tool love.
    I've been told. Dreaming`s free.
    Think I'll go, back to sleep.
    Everybody listen, voices in my head
    Everybody listen, do yours say, what mine says?

  11. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by pete376403 View Post
    Didn't read the whole thread but did do a search and the term JIS, as in Japanese Industry Standard, doesn't seem to appear. Philips screw drivers will root a JIS screw, no questions asked. Older Japanese bikes were JIS all over - look for the little dot on the screw head near the + slot. More modern bikes seem to be put together with either small external hex head screws or socket head screws.

    Favourite place to find buggered JIS screws would be carburetors, float bowl screws and diaphragm cover screws.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hozan-JIS-4-J...%20JIS%20screw.
    No.4 impact driver bit and a smack on the driver works for me. Then use a normal No. 4 philllips screw driver to remove them the rest of the way.

  12. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bonez View Post
    No.4 impact driver bit and a smack on the driver works for me. Then use a normal No. 4 philllips screw driver to remove them the rest of the way.
    Yup, as Dave says, impact driver bits are JIS.
    Obscure fact - Philips is DESIGNED to cam out of the screw at a certain torque, to prevent damage to parts from overtightening when assembling (as in the factory where the widget is built) What happens after that is is someone elses problem.
    it's not a bad thing till you throw a KLR into the mix.
    those cheap ass bitches can do anything with ductape.
    (PostalDave on ADVrider)

  13. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by pete376403 View Post
    Yup, as Dave says, impact driver bits are JIS.
    Obscure fact - Philips is DESIGNED to cam out of the screw at a certain torque, to prevent damage to parts from overtightening when assembling (as in the factory where the widget is built) What happens after that is is someone elses problem.
    Usually after they have been undone in the y I desribe its generally easy to use aphillips no. 4 screw driver from then on I've found. I undo the float bowls on my '76 CB550F in situe using a small ring spanner and 50mm no.4 phillips bit used in my battery drill. Easy as.

  14. #149
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    25th March 2004 - 17:22
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    Tools are not much use if you cant wield them with skill.

    Take today's repair on the bed my 9yr old thinks is a trampoline. Broken steel frame light gauge steel. Using some strategically placed blocks of wood I straighten the cross members like a Boss.


    Then I proceed to make the worst welds in Christendom.

    I really need a lesson. I suck.
    Should hold together for a while but. . .
    I've been told. Dreaming`s free.
    Think I'll go, back to sleep.
    Everybody listen, voices in my head
    Everybody listen, do yours say, what mine says?

  15. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by F5 Dave View Post
    Tools are not much use if you cant wield them with skill.

    Take today's repair on the bed my 9yr old thinks is a trampoline. Broken steel frame light gauge steel. Using some strategically placed blocks of wood I straighten the cross members like a Boss.


    Then I proceed to make the worst welds in Christendom.

    I really need a lesson. I suck.
    Should hold together for a while but. . .
    Arch or mig? Most Tech colleges run night courses on welding.

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