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Thread: Classics on Trade Me

  1. #46
    Join Date
    25th March 2004 - 17:22
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    RZ496/Street Triple R/GasGas/ etc etc
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    Wellington. . ok the hutt
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    I had TS125 piston in mine. Took it to 275cc or thereabouts. GS550 shocks raised the rear enough that the centre stand was redundant but quickened the steering somewhat. The brake front the same bike supercharged it.
    I've been told. Dreaming`s free.
    Think I'll go, back to sleep.
    Everybody listen, voices in my head
    Everybody listen, do yours say, what mine says?

  2. #47
    Join Date
    9th January 2005 - 22:12
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    christchurch
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackbird View Post

    Seeing as Voltaire mentioned the 50's T'bird, I've attached a photo of my 1955 Tiger 100 (photo taken in 1968). It was my only transport and carried me everywhere in all weathers. I actually know who currently owns it in the UK - good to hear that it still exists!
    is that the throttle cable hanging straight down ? thats weird!
    In the white room, with black curtains, at the station

  3. #48
    Join Date
    3rd February 2004 - 08:11
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    1982 Suzuki GS1100GK, 2008 KLR650
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    Wallaceville, Upper hutt
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    Quote Originally Posted by HenryDorsetCase View Post
    is that the throttle cable hanging straight down ? thats weird!
    When the handlebars are higher thank stock and the cable isn't long enough to route down by the headlight and under the tank.
    it's not a bad thing till you throw a KLR into the mix.
    those cheap ass bitches can do anything with ductape.
    (PostalDave on ADVrider)

  4. #49
    Join Date
    22nd October 2002 - 11:00
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    2019 KTM Duke 790
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    Quote Originally Posted by HenryDorsetCase View Post
    is that the throttle cable hanging straight down ? thats weird!
    That's how I bought it with the US bars. It was bloody uncomfortable to ride at any speed and not long after the photo was taken, I put dropped "Ace" bars on it. Far better to ride and much neater cabling

  5. #50
    Join Date
    20th January 2008 - 17:29
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    1972 Norton Commando
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    Auckland NZ's Epicentre
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    I like the Belstaff jacket, I have one, Mk 8 flying goggles and a Mike Hailwood pudding basin helmet somewhere.

    Sure it was a T100, paintwork is very 57' T110ish and tank is 57 or later. ( puts notebook in pocket and takes anorak off...)
    DeMyer's Laws - an argument that consists primarily of rambling quotes isn't worth bothering with.

  6. #51
    Join Date
    22nd October 2002 - 11:00
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voltaire View Post
    I like the Belstaff jacket, I have one, Mk 8 flying goggles and a Mike Hailwood pudding basin helmet somewhere.

    Sure it was a T100, paintwork is very 57' T110ish and tank is 57 or later. ( puts notebook in pocket and takes anorak off...)
    Def a 55 Tiger 100. Can't say that all the gear is original as I only bought it in 1967. The previous owner worked for the Reliant car company and resprayed the bike there and did a lot of chroming. The mufflers definitely weren't standard.

    I still have 2 early manuals covering pre-unit and unit construction twins, both in immaculate condition.
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  7. #52
    Join Date
    20th January 2010 - 14:41
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    husaberg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voltaire View Post
    I used to like projects, getting up early and standing outside the shop waiting to get the Trade and Exchange,phoning up hoping someone would be home and getting there first with the cash to buy.
    Then the research of old magazines and books. Going to swap meets and rummaging
    thru rusty bits to find a gem.
    There were no repro parts much then.

    Now its look on Trade Me, a few hours of internet research and hit the buy it now button, followed by buying bits on TM,Ebay and on line shops.

    I just sold a 52 Triumph Thunderbird Project after it sitting around for 4 years.( there is part two to this story).
    Lots of parts, many new repro ones,
    Attachment 336692

    My oldest project is a 1959 T110 that has been apart with rego on hold since my first Son was born. He is now 23.
    I bought it as a basket case in 1991 and had it fully restored in 12 months and rode it to the IOM TT.
    Brought it back here in 1993, it 'nipped up' and got pulled apart and put in boxes.

    Got a good project story to share?
    Sprunghub did it have the slickshift gearbox as well.



    Kinky is using a feather. Perverted is using the whole chicken

  8. #53
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    20th January 2008 - 17:29
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    Quote Originally Posted by husaberg View Post
    Sprunghub did it have the slickshift gearbox as well.
    From memory sprung hub stopped in 1954 with the introduction of the swinging arm.
    Its got a bad rep. From what I gather the Mk1 is not great but the Mk2 is less not great.

    Slickshift was for one year....58 or 59 then deleted but the cover remained while they used up stock.
    Interesting idea, as you changed gear the clutch would operate. Early version of the quick shifter?

    Downside is as we have all done when riding along went of non existent next higher gear which would result in clutch disengaging and engine unloaded.
    DeMyer's Laws - an argument that consists primarily of rambling quotes isn't worth bothering with.

  9. #54
    Join Date
    22nd October 2002 - 11:00
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voltaire View Post
    From memory sprung hub stopped in 1954 with the introduction of the swinging arm.
    Its got a bad rep. From what I gather the Mk1 is not great but the Mk2 is less not great.
    I always wondered whether defence scientists got the idea for the Claymore anti-personnel mine from the Triumph sprung hub. Filled with lethal springs and assorted shrapnel, one false move when disassembling or assembling would maim anyone unfortunate enough to get in the way.
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  10. #55
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    20th January 2008 - 17:29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackbird View Post
    I always wondered whether defence scientists got the idea for the Claymore anti-personnel mine from the Triumph sprung hub. Filled with lethal springs and assorted shrapnel, one false move when disassembling or assembling would maim anyone unfortunate enough to get in the way.
    Possibly the earliest recorded Warning on a motorcycle.
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    A jig is required as you say to avoid holes in roof by the two springs under load.

    Quite a bit of clever engineering to avoid using a swingarm and damper units or a plunger frame.

    Bearings are well over $250.00 each for them as obscure British with little demand.
    DeMyer's Laws - an argument that consists primarily of rambling quotes isn't worth bothering with.

  11. #56
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    22nd October 2002 - 11:00
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voltaire View Post
    Possibly the earliest recorded Warning on a motorcycle.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    A jig is required as you say to avoid holes in roof by the two springs under load.

    Quite a bit of clever engineering to avoid using a swingarm and damper units or a plunger frame.

    Bearings are well over $250.00 each for them as obscure British with little demand.
    Hahahaha - excellent! "Good" old British engineering at the time. Don't get me started on the pressure relief valves: http://geoffjames.blogspot.co.nz/201...esign-not.html .

  12. #57
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    20th January 2008 - 17:29
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    Ha, I thought it was just a oil pressure indicator, about as useful by your foot as the gear indicator that some had.
    DeMyer's Laws - an argument that consists primarily of rambling quotes isn't worth bothering with.

  13. #58
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    24th June 2004 - 17:27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voltaire View Post
    Possibly the earliest recorded Warning on a motorcycle.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	warning.jpg 
Views:	38 
Size:	250.1 KB 
ID:	336721

    A jig is required as you say to avoid holes in roof by the two springs under load.

    Quite a bit of clever engineering to avoid using a swingarm and damper units or a plunger frame.

    Bearings are well over $250.00 each for them as obscure British with little demand.
    That cast in warning was instrumental in me pulling one to bits... Blacksmiths apron, welding helmet and leather gauntlets working from under the bench... Fortunately the thing was flogged out and the springs we not exactly lethal any more. It was a ridiculous bit of kit that must have cost far more than a swing arm frame...

    Having said that - when swing arms did appear its fair to say not everyone was a fan. I suppose like anything it took a few attempts to get them to work properly

  14. #59
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    20th January 2008 - 17:29
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    Triumphs first attempt at a swinging arm was to braze on onto the 1"1/2 seat tube and although I never rode mine much in anger they were called the Tuning Fork as they flexed.
    The front forks were not much better.
    The styling was however very nice.
    Those guys who raced them must have had balls of steel.
    DeMyer's Laws - an argument that consists primarily of rambling quotes isn't worth bothering with.

  15. #60
    Join Date
    22nd October 2002 - 11:00
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voltaire View Post
    Those guys who raced them must have had balls of steel.
    I had a Triumph 3TA as my second ever motorcycle. The handling did indeed leave something to be desired as I thought it must have had a hinge hidden somewhere in the middle of the frame. I wish I'd had balls of steel when a car did a U turn right in front of me. As I exited over the handlebars, my balls connected with the large steering damper knob on the headstock. The resultant swollen purple plums in my trousers had me walking like John Wayne for several days.

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